Reading and Writing Cancer by Susan Gubar
How Words Heal

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Drawing on her experience, the author provides several pages of strategies for generating a blog entry: a solution to a cancer-related problem, for example, or explaining why a new word (“scanxiety” or “chemoflage”) is needed. Bright, upbeat, and empathetic, Gubar argues convincingly that words have the power to heal.
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Synopsis

An important addition to the literature of cancer by an award-winning scholar and memoirist.


Elaborating upon her “Living with Cancer” column in the New York Times, Susan Gubar helps patients, caregivers, and the specialists who seek to serve them. In a book both enlightening and practical, she describes how the activities of reading and writing can right some of cancer’s wrongs. To stimulate the writing process, she proposes specific exercises, prompts, and models. In discussions of the diary of Fanny Burney, the stories of Leo Tolstoy and Alice Munro, numerous memoirs, novels, paintings, photographs, and blogs, Gubar shows how readers can learn from art that deepens our comprehension of what it means to live or die with the disease.


From a writer whose own memoir, Memoir of a Debulked Woman: Enduring Ovarian Cancer, was described by the New York Times Book Review as “moving and instructive…and incredibly brave,” this volume opens a path to healing.

 

About Susan Gubar

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Susan Gubar is the coauthor of The Madwoman in the Attic, a foundational work of feminist criticism, and the coeditor of The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women. She lives in Bloomington, Indiana.
 
Published May 17, 2016 by W. W. Norton & Company. 240 pages
Genres: Health, Fitness & Dieting, Self Help, Education & Reference. Non-fiction
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Kirkus

Good
on Feb 15 2016

Drawing on her experience, the author provides several pages of strategies for generating a blog entry: a solution to a cancer-related problem, for example, or explaining why a new word (“scanxiety” or “chemoflage”) is needed. Bright, upbeat, and empathetic, Gubar argues convincingly that words have the power to heal.

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