Real People by Alison Lurie
A Novel

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Synopsis

At an artistic Garden of Eden, one writer finds that serpents lurk in every corner
The mansion is called Illyria, but for the writers and artists who flock there each summer, it may as well be paradise. Away from family, friends, and ordinary responsibilities, the creative spirit can flower, nurtured by the company of other artistic souls. Janet Belle Smith’s husband doesn’t understand why she can’t write at home—or really, for that matter, why she must write at all—but for Janet, the reason is clear. Only in Illyria can she be herself.  But as the writer mingles with her fellow artists—including a Marxist novelist, a Beat poet, a wild-man sculptor—she begins to fear that the “real” her isn’t who she expected, and Illyria is not the peaceful kingdom it appears to be. This creative paradise is rotting from inside out, and if Janet doesn’t move quickly, she’ll be trapped in the rubble when the walls come tumbling down.  This ebook features an illustrated biography of Alison Lurie including rare images from the author’s collection.
 

About Alison Lurie

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Alison Lurie, 1926 - Novelist Alison Lurie was born September 3, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois to Harry and Bernice Stewart Lurie. Her father was a Latvian-born teacher, scholar and socialist who founded the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds. She received an A.B. from Radcliffe College in 1947. Lurie was married to Jonathan Bishop for 37 years and had three sons, and then married Edward Hower, a novelist and professor. After finishing college, Lurie worked as an editorial assistant for Oxford University Press in New York, wanting to make a living as a writer. After years of receiving rejection slips, she devoted herself to raising her children. Lurie had taught at Cornell University since 1968, becoming a full professor in 1976 specializing in folklore and children's literature. Lurie's first novel was "Love and Friendship" (1962) and its characters were modeled on friends and colleagues. Afterwards, she published "The Nowhere City" (1965), "Imaginary Friends" (1967), "The War Between the Tates" (1974), which tells of the collapse of a perfect marriage between a professor and his wife, "Only Children" (1979), and "The Truth About Lorin Jones" (1988). "Foreign Affairs" (1984) won the Pulitzer Prize and tells the story of two academics in England that learn more about love than scholarship.
 
Published November 13, 2012 by Open Road Media. 188 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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