Red Scarf Girl by Ji-li Jiang
A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution

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Synopsis

This accessible autobiography is the true story of one girl's determination to hold her family together during one of the most terrifying eras of the twentieth century.

It's 1966, and twelve-year-old Ji-li Jiang has everything a girl could want: brains, friends, and a bright future in Communist China. But it's also the year that China's leader, Mao Ze-dong, launches the Cultural Revolution—and Ji-li's world begins to fall apart. Over the next few years, people who were once her friends and neighbors turn on her and her family, forcing them to live in constant terror of arrest. When Ji-li's father is finally imprisoned, she faces the most difficult dilemma of her life.

A personal and painful memoir—a page-turner as well as excellent material for social studies curricula—Red Scarf Girl also includes a thorough glossary and pronunciation guide.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

 

About Ji-li Jiang

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Author Bio: Ji-li Jiang (www.jilijiang.com) was born in Shanghai , China. For over twenty years she nursed her childhood memories of surviving the Cultural Revolution in China, and she finally brought them to life in her first book, Red Scarf Girl, which has sold more than 300,000 copies since it was published in 1997 and has become required reading in many schools. Following the success of Red Scarf Girl, she published her adaptation of Chinese classic folklore, Magical Monkey King: Mischief in Heaven. When she isn't writing or speaking, Ji-li devotes time to various cultural exchange programs, including leading group trips to China. She believes that a better understanding among people around the world is the only route to global peace. Illustrator Bio: Greg Ruth (www.gregthings.com) has worked in comics since 1993, creating artwork for The New York Times, DC Comics, Paradox Press, Fantagraphics Books, Caliber Comics, Dark Horse Comics, and The Matrix. His book projects include The Lost Boy, which he wrote and illustrated, and  The Secret Adventures of Jack London, The Haunting of Charles Dickens, A Pirate's Guide to First Grade, and R.L. Stine’s Goosebumps tales. After watching President Obama's Inauguration he was inspired to create sketches that eventually became the basis of his picture book Our Enduring Spirit. Greg lives in Massachusetts with his family.
 
Published October 26, 2010 by HarperCollins. 308 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Travel, Children's Books, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Red Scarf Girl

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Tai Shan and his father, Baba, like to climb to the tippy-top of their roof and fly kites.

Dec 01 2012 | Read Full Review of Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of t...

Kirkus Reviews

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She was a young teenager at the height of the fervor, when children rose up against their parents, students against teachers, and neighbor against neighbor in an orgy of doublespeak, name-calling, and worse.

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Kirkus Reviews

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A child's nightmare unfolds in Jiang's chronicle of the excesses of Chairman Mao's Cultural Revolution in China in the late 1960s.

May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of t...

Publishers Weekly

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The passionate tone of this memoir, Jiang's first book for children, does not obstruct the author's clarity as she recounts the turmoil during China's Cultural Revolution. It is 1966, and Ji-li, a hig

Oct 27 1997 | Read Full Review of Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of t...

Publishers Weekly

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Ruth (A Pirate’s Guide to First Grade) paints affecting closeups and dramatically lit spreads that ratchet up the tension as Tai Shan endures separation from his beloved father, Baba, who is imprisoned during China’s Cultural Revolution.

Nov 12 2012 | Read Full Review of Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of t...

Publishers Weekly

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It is 1966, and Ji-li, a highly ranked student, exceptional athlete and avid follower of Mao zealously joins her classmates in denouncing the Four Olds: ""old ideas, old culture, old customs and old habits."" Tables are turned, however, when her own family's bourgeois heritage is put under attack.

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But there’s good news—by subscribing today, you will receive 22 issues of Booklist magazine, 4 issues of Book Links, and single-login access to Booklist Online and over 160,000 reviews.

Oct 01 1997 | Read Full Review of Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of t...

Common Sense Media

Readers will appreciate that she honestly relates her experiences as a child a complicated time, her growing conclusions about what was happening around her -- and the difficult choices she had to make.

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Ji-Li Jiang paints a clear and devastating portrait of a brutal political movement that ruined many lives -- and had a deep impact on her family.

Aug 21 2015 | Read Full Review of Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of t...

Shelf Awareness

Twenty by Jenny Home Blog 0 - 3 years 4 - 7 years 8 - 12 years teen ...

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