Remember Me to Harlem by Emily Bernard, Langston Hughes & Carl Van Vechten
The Letters of Langston Hughes and Carl Van Vechten, 1925-1964

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Synopsis

Langston Hughes is widely remembered as a celebrated star of the Harlem Renaissance -- a writer whose bluesy, lyrical poems and novels still have broad appeal. What's less well known about Hughes is that for much of his life he maintained a friendship with Carl Van Vechten, a flamboyant white critic, writer, and photographer whose ardent support of black artists was peerless.
Despite their differences — Van Vechten was forty-four to Hughes twenty-two when they met–Hughes’ and Van Vechten’s shared interest in black culture lead to a deeply-felt, if unconventional friendship that would span some forty years. Between them they knew everyone — from Zora Neale Hurston to Richard Wright, and their letters, lovingly and expertly collected here for the first time, are filled with gossip about the antics of the great and the forgotten, as well as with talk that ranged from race relations to blues lyrics to the nightspots of Harlem, which they both loved to prowl. It’s a correspondence that, as Emily Bernard notes in her introduction, provides “an unusual record of entertainment, politics, and culture as seen through the eyes of two fascinating and irreverent men.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Emily Bernard, Langston Hughes & Carl Van Vechten

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Emily Bernard is associate professor, English Department and ALANA U.S. Ethnic Studies Program, University of Vermont. She is the author of several award-winning books, including Remember Me to Harlem: The Letters of Langston Hughes and Carl Van Vechten, which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She lives in Burlington, VT.
 
Published December 18, 2007 by Vintage. 402 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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Hughes had published only in a few newspapers and literary journals when, at a Harlem party in 1924, he met the flamboyant arts critic Van Vechten—who, though born into a well-heeled white Midwestern family, sometimes thought of himself as “colored” and in any event labored vigorously to publiciz...

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Publishers Weekly

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As the Harlem Renaissance unfolded in the 1920s, few were closer to its hub than the black poet and playwright Langston Hughes and his white friend and mentor, the writer, photographer and patron of t

Feb 01 2001 | Read Full Review of Remember Me to Harlem: The Le...

Publishers Weekly

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As the Harlem Renaissance unfolded in the 1920s, few were closer to its hub than the black poet and playwright Langston Hughes and his white friend and mentor, the writer, photographer and patron of the arts Carl Van Vechten.

| Read Full Review of Remember Me to Harlem: The Le...

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