Remix by Non Pratt

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Belying the contemporary setting and multitudinous references to snogging, condoms, and sex toys, the female characters’ passive to downright submissive behavior—and unsettlingly retro disparity in gender roles overall—seems drawn straight from the 1950s. Entertaining, witty, and often funny—but also oddly old-fashioned.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

Two girls test the strength of their friendship—and their hearts—over the course of a summer weekend in this contemporary novel perfect for fans of Morgan Matson and Rainbow Rowell.

Ruby and Kaz’s friendship has always worked like a well-oiled machine. Ruby is loud and acts impulsively, while Kaz is quiet and plans ahead for every scenario. Together, they are two halves of a whole. But when the girls run into their ex-boyfriends at a music festival, they suddenly find themselves acting out of character and navigating unchartered territory. Afraid of letting each other down, both girls start keeping secrets—with disastrous consequences.

Told in alternating perspectives between Ruby and Kaz, Remix is the story of two teenage girls fighting to hold on to their splintering relationships and rediscovering that true friendship—like love—is not so easily broken.
 

About Non Pratt

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After graduating from Trinity College Cambridge, Non Pratt became a nonfiction editor at Usborne, working on the bestselling Sticker Dolly Dressing and the Things to Make and Do series before moving across to fiction. She ran the list at Catnip Publishing from 2009 to 2013. She lives in Enfield with her husband and small(ish) child. Trouble is her first novel.
 
Published July 5, 2016 by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. 320 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Kirkus

Below average
on Apr 13 2016

Belying the contemporary setting and multitudinous references to snogging, condoms, and sex toys, the female characters’ passive to downright submissive behavior—and unsettlingly retro disparity in gender roles overall—seems drawn straight from the 1950s. Entertaining, witty, and often funny—but also oddly old-fashioned.

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