Report from the Interior by Paul Auster

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...while Auster’s reflections on his early life are often fascinating, especially to us old timers long enough in the tooth to have been around to remember fondly most all of the things he talks about, this is an uneven book. It is not Auster at his best.
-Blog Critics

Synopsis

Paul Auster's most intimate autobiographical work to date

In the beginning, everything was alive. The smallest objects were endowed with beating hearts . . .

Having recalled his life through the story of his physical self in Winter Journal, internationally acclaimed novelist Paul Auster now remembers the experience of his development from within through the encounters of his interior self with the outer world in Report from the Interior.
From his baby's-eye view of the man in the moon, to his childhood worship of the movie cowboy Buster Crabbe, to the composition of his first poem at the age of nine, to his dawning awareness of the injustices of American life, Report from the Interior charts Auster's moral, political, and intellectual journey as he inches his way toward adulthood through the postwar 1950s and into the turbulent 1960s.
Auster evokes the sounds, smells, and tactile sensations that marked his early life—and the many images that came at him, including moving images (he adored cartoons, he was in love with films), until, at its unique climax, the book breaks away from prose into pure imagery: The final section of Report from the Interior recapitulates the first three parts, told in an album of pictures. At once a story of the times—which makes it everyone's story—and the story of the emerging consciousness of a renowned literary artist, this four-part work answers the challenge of autobiography in ways rarely, if ever, seen before.
A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013

 

About Paul Auster

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Paul Auster is the bestselling author of Invisible, Man in the Dark, Travels in the Scriptorium, The Brooklyn Follies, and Oracle Night. I Thought My Father Was God, the NPR National Story Project anthology, which he edited, was a national bestseller. His work has been translated into thirty-five languages. He lives in Brooklyn, New York. 
 
Published November 19, 2013 by Henry Holt and Co.. 352 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Report from the Interior
All: 4 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 1

NY Times

Excellent
Reviewed by Sarah Manguso on Dec 20 2013

...the best parts of “Report From the Interior” are as excellent as one could hope. It would not be inaccurate to describe the first section, which gives the book its title, as perfect.

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Publishers Weekly

Above average
on Jul 08 2013

In this companion to an earlier memoir...Auster returns to many of the concerns of his 1950s childhood in South Orange, N.J., that ran like leitmotivs through his young life and helped forge the writer’s identity he would embrace by age 22.

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Blog Critics

Below average
Reviewed by Jack Goodstein on Nov 23 2013

...while Auster’s reflections on his early life are often fascinating, especially to us old timers long enough in the tooth to have been around to remember fondly most all of the things he talks about, this is an uneven book. It is not Auster at his best.

Read Full Review of Report from the Interior | See more reviews from Blog Critics

Financial Times

Above average
Reviewed by Ian Thomson on Nov 08 2013

...parts of Report from the Interior, fortunately, are a delight; the punctilious descriptions of mid-century suburban America are both funny and oddly affecting.

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65%

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