Requiem by Ken Scholes
(Psalms of Isaak)

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It’s all superficial show and no tell. The author can’t explain as the plot unwinds because that would mean only three or possibly four, not the five, books he’s promised the publisher. The result is a lot of things happening where the reader just has to accept it’s happening and not ask awkward questions starting with who or why or how.
-Thinking About Books

Synopsis

Ken Scholes's debut novel, Lamentation, was an event in fantasy. Heralded as a "mesmerizing debut novel" by Publishers Weekly, and a "vividly imagined SF-fantasy hybrid set in a distant, postapocalyptic future" by Booklist, the series gained many fans. It was followed by Canticle and Antiphon. Now comes the fourth book in The Psalms of Isaak, Requiem.

Who is the Crimson Empress, and what does her conquest of the Named Lands really mean? Who holds the keys to the Moon Wizard's Tower?

The plots within plots are expanding as the characters seek their way out of the maze of intrigue. The world is expanding as they discover lands beyond their previous carefully controlled knowledge. Hidden truths reveal even deeper truths, and nothing is as it seemed to be.


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About Ken Scholes

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KEN SCHOLES is the author of the acclaimed series The Psalms of Isaak, which comprises Lamentation, Canticle, Antiphon, and now Requiem.  He lives near Portland, Oregon, with his wife, Jen West Scholes, and their three-year-old twin daughters. Visit him on the web at www.kenscholes.com.
 
Published June 18, 2013 by Tor Books. 399 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Requiem
All: 2 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 1

Kirkus

Excellent
on Apr 11 2013

As various parts of the epic’s plotlines become clearer, motivations become murkier; it’s still anyone’s guess how this will end. Exciting, dizzying, heartbreaking.

Read Full Review of Requiem (Psalms of Isaak) | See more reviews from Kirkus

Thinking About Books

Below average
Reviewed by David Marshall on Jul 04 2013

It’s all superficial show and no tell. The author can’t explain as the plot unwinds because that would mean only three or possibly four, not the five, books he’s promised the publisher. The result is a lot of things happening where the reader just has to accept it’s happening and not ask awkward questions starting with who or why or how.

Read Full Review of Requiem (Psalms of Isaak)

Reader Rating for Requiem
87%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 31 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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