Requiem by Frances Itani

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews

Itani’s goals are laudable: the facts around the internment are shameful and must never be forgotten. Good goals, unfortunately, don’t always make for good fiction; Joy Kogawa has left us a literary legacy to be built on, not reinvented.
-Toronto Star

Synopsis

By the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize-winning author of Deafening comes a new historical novel that traces the lives of one Japanese-Canadian family during and after their internment in the 1940s.

In 1942 the government removed Bin Okuma's family from their home on British Columbia’s west coast and forced them into internment camps. They were allowed to take only the possessions they could carry, and nine-year-old Bin was forced to watch as neighbors raided his family’s home before the transport boats even undocked. One hundred miles from the “Protected Zone,” they formed makeshift communities without direct access to electricity, plumbing or food—for five years.

Fifty years later, after his wife’s sudden death, Bin travels across the country to find the biological father who has been lost to him. Both running from grief and driving straight toward it, Bin must ask himself whether he truly wants to find First Father, the man who made a fateful decision that almost destroyed his family all those years ago. With his wife’s persuasive voice in his head and the echo of their love in his heart, Bin embarks on an unforgettable journey into his past that will throw light on a dark time in our shared history.
 

About Frances Itani

See more books from this Author
Frances Itani is the author of Deafening, winner of a Commonwealth Writers' Prize and the Drummer General's Award, and short-listed for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award; and Remembering the Bones, short-listed for a Commonwealth Writers' Prize.
 
Published August 7, 2012 by Atlantic Monthly Press. 336 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, History. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Requiem
All: 2 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 1

Toronto Star

Below average
Reviewed by Emily Donaldson on Jan 12 2012

Itani’s goals are laudable: the facts around the internment are shameful and must never be forgotten. Good goals, unfortunately, don’t always make for good fiction; Joy Kogawa has left us a literary legacy to be built on, not reinvented.

Read Full Review of Requiem | See more reviews from Toronto Star

National Post arts

Above average
Reviewed by Anne Chudobiak on Sep 30 2011

The closer he gets to his destination, the easier it is for readers to give up expectations: I thought I wanted to read about the camps, but enjoyed Requiem most when it was less stringently concerned with historical fact.

Read Full Review of Requiem | See more reviews from National Post arts

Reader Rating for Requiem
87%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 39 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×