Rescue and Flight by Susan Elisabeth Subak
American Relief Workers Who Defied the Nazis

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Synopsis

When Susan Elisabeth Subak discovered that members of the Unitarian Church had helped her Jewish father immigrate to the United States, she was unaware of the impact the organization had made during World War II. After years of research, Subak uncovers the little-known story of the Unitarian Service Committee, which rescued European refugees during World War II, and the remarkable individuals who made it happen. The Unitarian Service Committee was among the few American organizations committed to helping refugees during World War II. The staff who ran the committee assisted those endangered by the Nazi regime, from famous writers and artists to the average citizen. Part of a larger network of American relief workers, the Unitarian Committee helped refugees negotiate the official and legal channels of escape and, when those methods failed, the more complex underground channels. From their offices in Portugal and southern France they created escape routes through Europe to the United States, South America, and England, and rescued thousands, often at great personal risk.
 

About Susan Elisabeth Subak

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William F. Schulz served as Executive Director of Amnesty International USA from 1994 to 2006. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress; a Presidential Fellow at Simmons College in Boston; and an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Wagner School of New York University. Schulz is author of two books on human rights: In Our Own Best Interest: How Defending Human Rights Benefits Us All and Tainted Legacy: 9/11 and the Ruin of Human Rights. He is the editor of The Phenomenon of Torture: Readings and Commentary, also published by the University of Pennsylvania Press.
 
Published May 1, 2010 by University of Nebraska Press. 342 pages
Genres: History, Religion & Spirituality, War. Non-fiction

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