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Bolaño's lively storytelling keeps us compelled whether he uses dialogue, monologue or third-person reportage. Each tale turns the reader into a voyeur, grasping at snapshots of troubled lives and ghosts.
-Guardian

Synopsis

One of the remarkable qualities of Bolano's short stories is that they seem to tell what Bolano called 'the secret story', 'the one we'll never know'. The Return contains thirteen unforgettable tales bent on returning to haunt you, most of them appearing in English for the first time here. Wide-ranging, suggestive, and daring, a Bolano story is just as likely to concern the unexpected fate of a beautiful ex-girlfriend, the history of a porn star or two embittered police detectives debating their favourite weapons: his plots go anywhere and everywhere and they always surprise. Consider the title piece: a young party animal collapses in a Parisian disco and dies on the dance floor; just as his soul is departing his body, it realizes strange doings are afoot -- and what follows next defies the imagination (except Bolano's own, of course). This treasure trove of disquieting short master-works from the giant of Latin American literature perfectly encapsulates 'the fact that Bolano writes with such elegance, verve and style and is so immensely readable' (Guardian).
 

About Author

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Roberto Bolaño was born in Santiago, Chile, in 1953. He grew up in Chile and Mexico City. He is the author of The Savage Detectives, which received the Herralde Prize and the Rómulo Gallegos Prize, and 2666, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award. He died in Blanes, Spain, at the age of fifty.
 
Published January 1, 2012 by Picador. 199 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Guardian

Excellent
Reviewed by Mina Holland on Sep 22 2012

Bolaño's lively storytelling keeps us compelled whether he uses dialogue, monologue or third-person reportage. Each tale turns the reader into a voyeur, grasping at snapshots of troubled lives and ghosts.

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