Rivers of Gold by Hugh Thomas
The Rise of the Spanish Empire, from Columbus to Magellan

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Synopsis

From one of the greatest historians of the Spanish world, here is a fresh and fascinating account of Spain’s early conquests in the Americas. Hugh Thomas’s magisterial narrative of Spain in the New World has all the characteristics of great historical literature: amazing discoveries, ambition, greed, religious fanaticism, court intrigue, and a battle for the soul of humankind.

Hugh Thomas shows Spain at the dawn of the sixteenth century as a world power on the brink of greatness. Her monarchs, Fernando and Isabel, had retaken Granada from Islam, thereby completing restoration of the entire Iberian peninsula to Catholic rule. Flush with success, they agreed to sponsor an obscure Genoese sailor’s plan to sail west to the Indies, where, legend purported, gold and spices flowed as if they were rivers. For Spain and for the world, this decision to send Christopher Columbus west was epochal—the dividing line between the medieval and the modern.

Spain’s colonial adventures began inauspiciously: Columbus’s meagerly funded expedition cost less than a Spanish princess’s recent wedding. In spite of its small scale, it was a mission of astounding scope: to claim for Spain all the wealth of the Indies. The gold alone, thought Columbus, would fund a grand Crusade to reunite Christendom with its holy city, Jerusalem.

The lofty aspirations of the first explorers died hard, as the pursuit of wealth and glory competed with the pursuit of pious impulses. The adventurers from Spain were also, of course, curious about geographical mysteries, and they had a remarkable loyalty to their country. But rather than bridging earth and heaven, Spain’s many conquests bore a bitter fruit. In their search for gold, Spaniards enslaved “Indians” from the Bahamas and the South American mainland. The eloquent protests of Bartolomé de las Casas, here much discussed, began almost immediately. Columbus and other Spanish explorers—Cortés, Ponce de León, and Magellan among them—created an empire for Spain of unsurpassed size and scope. But the door was soon open for other powers, enemies of Spain, to stake their claims.
Great men and women dominate these pages: cardinals and bishops, priors and sailors, landowners and warriors, princes and priests, noblemen and their determined wives.

Rivers of Gold is a great story brilliantly told. More significant, it is an engrossing history with many profound—often disturbing—echoes in the present.
 

About Hugh Thomas

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Hugh Thomas is the author of The Spanish Civil War, Conquest, and many other books. A former Chairman of the Centre for Policy Studies (U.K.), he was made Lord Thomas of Swinnerton in 1981. He is currently a University Professor at Boston University. He lives in London.
 
Published November 20, 2013 by Random House. 720 pages
Genres: History, Travel, War. Non-fiction

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Defeating the viziers of Al-Andalus required forging strong links among several Iberian kingdoms, whence the wedding of Isabel of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon and, in the wake of civil war, the formation of “a national nobility with patriotic loyalties.” Following the expulsion or forced conve...

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Publishers Weekly

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Thomas has long belonged to the elite of Spanish studies. His popular reputation was made in 1961 by a sweeping history of the Spanish Civil War, strongly sympathetic to the Second Republic and smu

Apr 12 2004 | Read Full Review of Rivers of Gold: The Rise of t...

The Guardian

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Rivers of Gold: The Rise of the Spanish Empire by Hugh Thomas Buy it from the Guardian bookshop Search the Guardian bookshop In 1492 the Spanish explorer Christophe...

Dec 11 2010 | Read Full Review of Rivers of Gold: The Rise of t...

The Guardian

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Rivers of Gold: The Rise of the Spanish Empire by Hugh Thomas 624pp, Weidenfeld, £25 In 1992, the 500th anniversary of Columbus's first journey to the new world was celebrated with great fanfare in Spain, though across the Atlantic feelings were understandably more mixed.

Feb 07 2004 | Read Full Review of Rivers of Gold: The Rise of t...

Publishers Weekly

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Indeed, readers free from colonial prejudice will be surprised to find themselves also written out of history: "Who can doubt now," Thomas asks rhetorically, "that [the Spanish] were right to denounce the idea of religion based on human sacrifice or the simple worship of the sun or the rain?").

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Bookmarks Magazine

(1971): A classic history of Cuban history, from the British capture of Havana in the 1700s through Fidel Castro’s reign.

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