Round the Red Lamp and Other Medical Writings by Arthur Conan Doyle

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When Round the Red Lamp appeared in 1894, readers and reviewers were appalled. Expecting tales in the style of Conan Doyle's popular Sherlock Holmes stories, readers were shocked to find instead harrowing medical stories involving childbirth, syphilis, and botched amputations.

The tales in Round the Red Lamp range in theme from the realistic to the bizarre in such stories as 'Lot No. 249', involving a reanimated mummy that stalks a young medical student, and 'The Los Amigos Fiasco', where a doctor's misconception about the effects of electricity brings about surprising results for a condemned prisoner. In addition to the fifteen stories in the original collection, this edition reprints three of Conan Doyle's other rare medical tales, including the chilling masterpiece 'The Retirement of Signor Lambert'.

In addition to being a prolific writer, Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was a medical doctor and the author of a variety of nonfiction articles and essays on medical subjects. This edition includes a selection of Conan Doyle's rare nonfiction medical writings, some of which have never been reprinted. As Robert Darby argues in the introduction to this edition, these stories and articles provide 'a rare glimpse into the world of a provincial GP at the moment when old-style medicine was dying and the modern medical profession was emerging'.


About Arthur Conan Doyle

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The most famous fictional detective in the world is Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. However, Doyle was, at best, ambivalent about his immensely successful literary creation and, at worst, resentful that his more "serious" fiction was relatively ignored. Born in Edinburgh, Doyle studied medicine from 1876 to 1881 and received his M.D. in 1885. He worked as a military physician in South Africa during the Boer War and was knighted in 1902 for his exceptional service. Doyle was drawn to writing at an early age. Although he attempted to enter private practice in Southsea, Portsmouth, in 1882, he soon turned to writing in his spare time; it eventually became his profession. As a Liberal Unionist, Doyle ran, unsuccessfully, for Parliament in 1903. During his later years, Doyle became an avowed spiritualist. Doyle sold his first story, "The Mystery of the Sasassa Valley," to Chambers' Journal in 1879. When Doyle published the novel, A Study in Scarlet in 1887, Sherlock Holmes was introduced to an avid public. Doyle is reputed to have used one of his medical professors, Dr. Joseph Bell, as a model for Holmes's character. Eventually, Doyle wrote three additional Holmes novels and five collections of Holmes short stories. A brilliant, though somewhat eccentric, detective, Holmes employs scientific methods of observation and deduction to solve the mysteries that he investigates. Although an "amateur" private detective, he is frequently called upon by Scotland Yard for assistance. Holmes's assistant, the faithful Dr. Watson, provides a striking contrast to Holmes's brilliant intellect and, in Doyle's day at least, serves as a character with whom the reader can readily identify. Having tired of Holmes's popularity, Doyle even tried to kill the great detective in "The Final Problem" but was forced by an outraged public to resurrect him in 1903. Although Holmes remained Doyle's most popular literary creation, Doyle wrote prolifically in other genres, including historical adventure, science fiction, and supernatural fiction. Despite Doyle's sometimes careless writing, he was a superb storyteller. His great skill as a popular author lay in his technique of involving readers in his highly entertaining adventures. Robert Darby is an independent medical historian and visiting fellow at the Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University.
Published October 1, 2007 by Valancourt Books. 348 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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