Sappho by Sappho
A Garland : The Poems and Fragments of

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Synopsis

Offers a new translation of the approximately one-twelfth of Sappho's total writing that has survived to the present, and includes brief essays on her life, writing style, and work
 

About Sappho

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Sappho was born in Lesbos. Jim Powell, a native of Berkely, has published poems in many magazines.
 
Published October 1, 1993 by Farrar Straus & Giroux (T). 65 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Sappho

The Guardian

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The Girls: Sappho Goes to Hollywood Diana McLellan 440pp, Robson Books, £17.95 If you drew a Venn diagram of Man's Best Fantasy and Man's Worst Nightmare, the middle bit would simply say Lesbians.

Mar 31 2001 | Read Full Review of Sappho: A Garland : The Poems...

The Guardian

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Sappho's Leap: A Novel by Erica Jong 316pp, Arcadia, £11.95 Sappho is going through one of her Heroic Periods.

Nov 13 2004 | Read Full Review of Sappho: A Garland : The Poems...

The Guardian

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As Richard Aldington said in his 1919 translation of Anacreon (an even more hedonistic ancient Greek poet whose name was often linked to Sappho's), the aim of previous versions seems to have been to prove that the Greeks wrote doggerel, but the very scantiness of material we have with Sappho allo...

Sep 29 2001 | Read Full Review of Sappho: A Garland : The Poems...

Publishers Weekly

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At least Sappho's frequent, explicit sexual encounters keep the reader turning the pages, though even these methodical titillations belong neither to the seventh nor the 21st century, but to that late-20th-century decade when free love promised direct passage to the Elysian Fields.

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Los Angeles Times

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Sappho didn't write sonnets (which hadn't been invented) any more than Strauss wrote symphonies, but Porter is allowed poetic license.

Apr 23 1993 | Read Full Review of Sappho: A Garland : The Poems...

London Review of Books

Jong infuses her novel with echoes of Homer’s epic, as her Sappho travels to Delphi, Egypt, the Land of the Amazons, the Land of the Dead, the Island of the Philosophers and the Land of the Centaurs, and enriches the narrative with her own elegant adaptations of Sappho’s fragments from the origin...

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London Review of Books

The much-translated (and notoriously strange) Fragment 31 – quoted below in Anne Carson’s closely literal modern version – comes in for particular attention: He seems to me equal to the gods that man whoever he is who opposite you sits and listens close to your sweet speaking and lovely laughi...

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Austin Chronicle

It isn't often that one looks forward with excitement to a new translation of an ancient and much translated text, but that's how I anticipated reading Anne Carson's translation of Sappho's complete works.

Apr 25 2003 | Read Full Review of Sappho: A Garland : The Poems...

The New York Review of Books

In a fragment of a Hellenistic elegy called “Loves, or the Beautiful Boys,” by a certain Phanocles, we are told that after the legendary poet Orpheus was torn to pieces by the women of Thrace, his head and his lyre—the instrument from which lyric poetry derives its name—were borne by the waves to...

Aug 14 2003 | Read Full Review of Sappho: A Garland : The Poems...

The New York Review of Books

Mr. Carne-Ross’s review of the poems and texts in my Sappho volume reveal a disregard of the clearly stated nature of the book, of the introduction, concordance, notes, and texts.

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Project MUSE

Although Prins constantly questions form, she structures her argument with great care: from a classicist's introductory chapter on Sappho's name and fragments, we are brought to Sappho's afterlife in Victorian texts such as Henry Thornton Wharton's Sappho (1887) and Michael Field's Long Ago (188...

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Project MUSE

Snyder's aim in Lesbian Desire in the Lyrics of Sappho is to make Sappho's poetry "come alive for the modern reader" (ix), which is to say, for the Greekless reader.

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Project MUSE

Reading against the current critical practice in feminist and lesbian studies of locating sites of lesbian erasure, Ruth Vanita's study of Sapphic and Marian images in the works of English writers from the Romantics onward presents a compelling counternarrative of literary ancestry that claims a ...

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Boston Review

Compare Carson’s uncommonly faithful translation of the four spare words comprising Sappho’s fragment 145— do not move stones —with the poet Mary Barnard’s version of the same four words in her 1958 best-selling collection entitled Sap...

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