Sarmada by Fadi Azzam

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Synopsis

Sarmada, Arabic for perpetuate or the eternally-not-changed, is the novel s fictitious setting. In the title, Fadi Azzam creates a new word (a derivative female form of noun-verb, which does not exist in Arabic) and in so doing immediately lets the reader know that women are the protagonists of this story that spans several generations, from Syria to Paris and back again. The novel is set in the Druze area and is a declaration of love for tolerance and for the peaceful coexistence of the many religious groups that live in close proximity. Myths, communists, nationalists, murder, illicit love, superstition, erotic trees and women s breasts make up the tapestry of this strange, beautifully writen, first novel. Fadi Azzam narrates, just as he writes poetry: Sarmada is direct, ruthless and full of fire.
 

About Fadi Azzam

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Published January 9, 2012 by Interlink Pub Group. 216 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Sarmada

New York Journal of Books

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“.. . a troubling look through the portals of a history and a culture rife with sexism western readers may find difficult to digest—even as they are seduced into the stories like uneasy voyeurs.”

Jan 09 2012 | Read Full Review of Sarmada

New York Journal of Books

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“.. . a troubling look through the portals of a history and a culture rife with sexism western readers may find difficult to digest—even as they are seduced into the stories like uneasy voyeurs.”

Jan 09 2012 | Read Full Review of Sarmada

The Bookbag

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Sarmada by Fadi Azzam and Adam Talib (Translator). Retrieved ...

Jan 16 2012 | Read Full Review of Sarmada

The Bookbag

And for much of Azzam's novel it seems a forgotten village, lost in the rituals and mysticism of ancient Druze belief and folk tales that inform the collective consciousness of the place.

Jan 16 2012 | Read Full Review of Sarmada

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