Savages by Joe Kane

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Synopsis

Savages is a firsthand account, by turn hilarious, heartbreaking, and thrilling, of a small band of Amazonian warriors and their battle to preserve their way of life. Includes eight pages of photos.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Joe Kane

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Joe Kane's "Phantom of the Movies(R)" columns and reviews have appeared in the "New York Daily News since 1984. He also publishes "The Phantom of the Movies'(R) VideoScope: The Ultimate Genre-Video Guide magazine, read by movie lovers and industry insiders alike. He lives in New York City.
 
Published January 4, 2012 by Vintage. 306 pages
Genres: History, Nature & Wildlife, Travel, Action & Adventure, Science & Math, Political & Social Sciences, Business & Economics, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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What followed was a journey along tangled paths: into the heart of the Huaorani territory, into the trust of the people, into the offices of oil executives and bureaucrats whose goals never seem to include a viable place for the Huaorani.

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Publishers Weekly

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Firsthand account of the battle between oil companies and an indigenous Indian population for control of territory in the Amazon. (Aug.)

Aug 26 1996 | Read Full Review of Savages

Publishers Weekly

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Savages is a hilarious and deeply moving account of what happens when two disparate civilizations clash. The Huaorani, a small nation of nomadic Amazonian warriors, reside amid some of Ecuador's riche

Sep 04 1995 | Read Full Review of Savages

Publishers Weekly

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Firsthand account of the battle between oil companies and an indigenous Indian population for control of territory in the Amazon.

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Publishers Weekly

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The Ecuadorian government and the world's multinational oil companies want to extract that oil and, apparently, don't care what becomes of either the Huaorani people or the land on which they live.

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Smithsonian

Kane was working for an environmental organization, the Rainforest Action Network, when the Huaorani became the center of a political dispute: in a petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund charged that oil drilling on Huaorani land would be eth...

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