Saved by Edward Bond
(Student Editions)

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Described by Edward Bond as 'almost irresponsibly optimistic', Saved is a play set in London in the sixties and reflects a time of social change. Its subject is the cultural poverty and frustration of a generation of young people on the dole and living on council estates. The play was first staged privately in November 1965 at the Royal Court Theatre for members of the English Stage Society at a time when plays were still censored. With its scenes of violence, including the stoning of a baby in its pram, Saved became a notorious play and a cause célèbre. It has since had a profound influence on a whole new generation of writers who emerged in the 1990s.

Commentary and notes by David Davis.


About Edward Bond

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Because of its pivotal scene, which involves the stoning to death of a baby by a gang of young toughs in a London park, Edward Bond's first major production, Saved (1965), was banned in its entirety by the Lord Chamberlain. In drawing attention to the plot, the censor drew attention away from the play's techniques. A distracting violence is still the center of Bond's works Early Morning (1968), The Sea ( ), and The Bundle (1978). Bond's violence is not simply an image of evil or crude dramatic shock. It is meant as something to come to terms with intellectually, or even-as in The Bundle-to be agreed to, as the price of effective action. In its obviousness, Bond's brutality challenges the audience to acknowledge its own hidden, structural ruthlessness. The playwright's ideas, however, often seem inadequately worked out and inadequately expressed in prefaces that share nothing of the vivacity and clarity of those of George Bernard Shaw. Bond has never lost touch with an impressive stiff poetry of the stage, which is most evident in Bingo, about Shakespeare's last days, and The Fool (1976), about the madness of the poet John Clare. Among Bond's more recent works are The Worlds (1979), and a trilogy, The War Plays (1985).
Published April 5, 2013 by Bloomsbury Methuen Drama. 176 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Arts & Photography, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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The Guardian

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I have no idea what the dominant flavour of turducken is, and I'm not sure I'd ever want to find out, but the dominant flavour of Winder's book is Bond, James Bond.

Jul 07 2006 | Read Full Review of Saved (Student Editions)

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