Scheherazade by Megan Kelso
Stories of Love, Treachery, Mothers, and Monsters

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Synopsis

This is a collection of material from 23 of the most exciting and interesting female cartoonists working today. For years Kelso wanted to edit an anthology of female cartoonists, but didn't know what would tie it together. A few years ago, she noticed an explosion of younger female cartoonists who were truly ambitious and promising, and got this idea to work with them as a very active, hands-on editor, which is all too rare in comics. In "Queen Scheherazade of the 1001 Nights", Kelso found a role model: the archetypal (female) storyteller, cheating death by enthralling her royal captor with new installments of a vast, interconnected story. Like her stories, the tales in this book take on broad human concerns: love, life, death, money, food, treachery, mothers and monsters. (A framing story by Ariel Bordeaux will bookend the collection and thread between all the other stories, which range from five to 14 pages each.) But the fact that they are all women is secondary to their promise as important contributors to a new era in the medium of comics, one marked by their energy, their potential and their ferocity.
 

About Megan Kelso

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Megan Kelso lives in Seattle, WA with her husband and daughter. Her books include Queen of the Black Black, The Squirrel Mother, and Artichoke Tales.
 
Published November 22, 2004 by Soft Skull Press. 224 pages
Genres: Comics & Graphic Novels, Science Fiction & Fantasy. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Scheherazade

Publishers Weekly

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There are cartoonists who draw on fine art (e.g., Vanessa Davis, whose "I Wonder Where the Yellow Went" is a series of her fluid autobiographical sketches) and on prose literature (e.g., Gabrielle Bell, who adapts a Kate Chopin story as "One Afternoon").

Sep 27 2004 | Read Full Review of Scheherazade: Stories of Love...

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