Scorecasting by Tobias J. Moskowitz
The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played and Games Are Won

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Synopsis

In Scorecasting, University of Chicago behavioral economist Tobias Moskowitz teams up with veteran Sports Illustrated writer L. Jon Wertheim to overturn some of the most cherished truisms of sports, and reveal the hidden forces that shape how basketball, baseball, football, and hockey games are played, won and lost.

Drawing from Moskowitz's original research, as well as studies from fellow economists such as bestselling author Richard Thaler, the authors look at: the influence home-field advantage has on the outcomes of games in all sports and why it exists; the surprising truth about the universally accepted axiom that defense wins championships;  the subtle biases that umpires exhibit in calling balls and strikes in key situations; the unintended consequences of referees' tendencies in every sport to "swallow the whistle," and more.

Among the insights that Scorecasting reveals:
Why Tiger Woods is prone to the same mistake in high-pressure putting situations that you and I areWhy professional teams routinely overvalue draft picks The myth of momentum  or the "hot hand" in sports, and why so many fans, coaches, and broadcasters fervently subscribe to itWhy NFL coaches rarely go for a first down on fourth-down situations--even when their reluctance to do so reduces their chances of winning.

In an engaging narrative that takes us from the putting greens of Augusta to the grid iron of a small parochial high school in Arkansas, Scorecasting will forever change how you view the game, whatever your favorite sport might be.




From the Hardcover edition.
 

About Tobias J. Moskowitz

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TOBIAS MOSKOWITZ is the Fama Family Chaired Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago. He is the winner of the 2007 Fischer Black Prize, which honors the top finance scholar in the world under the age of 40. L. JON WERTHEIM is a senior writer for Sports Illustrated, a recent Ferris Professor at Princeton, and the author of five books, including Strokes of Genius: Federer, Nadal, and the Greatest Match Ever Played. For more information go to scorecasting.com
 
Published January 19, 2011 by Crown Archetype. 288 pages
Genres: Health, Fitness & Dieting, Sports & Outdoors, Business & Economics. Non-fiction
Bestseller Status:
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Unrated Critic Reviews for Scorecasting

Kirkus Reviews

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In a Freakonomics for sports, an economist and a sportswriter use the power of data analysis to debunk some of the sports world’s conventional wisdom.

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The New York Times

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In baseball, though the authors are a little naïve about the art of calling balls and strikes (no one, not even the players, wants or expects the umpires to call a strict rule-book strike), their numbers are, well, striking: fewer called strikes, especially in crucial situations, against the home...

Jan 27 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

The Wall Street Journal

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Never mind that only 16 of baseball's current 30 teams existed in 1903, that 20 teams have won the World Series since 1967 and that only one team that existed in 1967 hasn't made the World Series since then (the Cubs).

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The Wall Street Journal

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Inferior teams simply win more often in baseball, where the elusive object is to "hit 'em where they ain't"—thus, you'll see 1-15 NFL teams but never an 11-151 baseball team.

Jan 22 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

Examiner

But even if you don’t always agree with Scorecasting’s conclusions, there’s a good chance you’ll discover some unconventional math and behavioral economics stats to employ the next time you get into an argument over, say, how much Eli Manning has been worth to the New York Giants or why New York...

Jul 24 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

Book Reporter

While I am an avid reader and more than willing to share my thoughts about the books I read on the pages of Bookreporter, I am rarely willing to join book groups or literary discussions about what I read.

Jan 24 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

The Washington Times

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What emerges next is a classic case of conformity - sporting officials unknowingly call more favorably toward the home team as the home crowd is the majority egging them on.

Feb 18 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

Dallas News

The explanation: “Home teams receive fewer penalties per game than away teams — about half a penalty less per game — and are charged with fewer yards per penalty.” In baseball, “Home teams are more likely to be successful when stealing a base and when turning a double play, yet the distance betw...

Jan 28 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

NJ.com

In the chapter called “Comforts at Home,” the authors confirm what any sports fan has known for years about the advantage of playing on your own turf: “The size of the (home field) advantage is remarkably stable in each sport.

Jan 09 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

London Review of Books

This is true for US college basketball, where away sides are often disadvantaged by having to rush from town to town while the home teams get a day off – and in college basketball home court advantage runs as high as 69 per cent.

Jun 30 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

LV Revealed

Scorecasting is a light book that's pleasant and easy to read that provides some insight into betting sports, and I think it works as entertainment and provides enough meat to make it worthwhile to the sports bettor looking to improve his handicapping skills.

May 13 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

The Hardball Times

That said, if I can excuse the Scorecasters for not mentioning Walsh's article in their book, Studeman's criticism does point to a trend in the overall book.

Feb 21 2011 | Read Full Review of Scorecasting: The Hidden Infl...

Reader Rating for Scorecasting
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