Seeing Trees by Nancy Ross Hugo
Discover the Extraordinary Secrets of Everyday Trees

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Synopsis

Have you ever seen the delicate flowers of a red maple? The emerging leaves of a tulip poplar? The twigs of a beech? When you look at a tree up close, you begin to appreciate trees in a whole new way. Seeing Trees invites readers to watch trees with the care and sensitivity that birdwatchers watch birds. Focusing on 10 common trees of North America, Nancy Ross Hugo highlights the rewards of tree viewing and describes some of the most visually interesting leaves, flowers, fruits, buds, leaf scars, twigs, and bark of familiar trees.  Using software developed for work with microscopes, Robert Llewellyn created incredibly sharp close-up photographs of the tree detail by stitching together 8 to 45 images of each subject—each shot at a different focal point.  The combination of these lavish photos with Nancy Ross Hugo’s writing makes each page come alive with the beauty of the growing process. The result is a gorgeous journey into the life cycle of trees.

Featured trees include the American Beech, Ginkgo, Red Maple, Southern Magnolia, Tulip Poplar, White Oak, White Pine, American Sycamore, Black Walnut and Eastern Red Cedar.

 

About Nancy Ross Hugo

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Nancy Ross Hugo has been writing, lecturing, and teaching about trees, native plants, and floral design for over thirty years. Her writing has appeared in Horticulture, Fine Gardening, American Forests, Country Journal, Virginia Living, and Country Life. For eight years, her weekly columns on gardening and natural history ("Earth Works") appeared in the Richmond Times-Dispatch, and her monthly "Habitat" column on gardening for wildlife appeared in Virginia Wildlife for ten. She has been recognized for excellence in magazine and newspaper feature writing by the Garden Writers Association and by the Virginia Urban Forest Council. As education manager of the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, she supervised adult and children's education. She is the author of Earth Works: Readings for Backyard Gardeners and, with Dr. Jeffrey Kirwan, of Remarkable Trees of Virginia. She and her husband John live in Howardsville, Virginia where they manage the outdoor education center Flower Camp. She was cited for Outstanding Achievement in Field of Horticulture by the Garden Club of Virginia in 1988 and received the Dugdale Award for Conservation in 2001. Robert Llewellyn has been photographing trees and landscapes for almost forty years. His photographs have been featured in major art exhibits, and more than thirty books featuring his photography are in print. His 2007 book, Empires of the Forest: Jamestown and the Beginning of America, won five national awards in nonfiction and photography, and his The Capital was an official diplomatic gift of the White House and State Department. Llewellyn honed his tree photography skills while working on Remarkable Trees of Virginia (2008), a four year project, creating landscape photographs that have been called "a spectacular tribute to Virginia's native trees." Seeing Trees showcases a new form of photography, however. Using software developed for work with microscopes, Llewellyn creates incredibly sharp close-ups by stitching together 8 to 45 images of each subject #8212; each shot at a different focal point. Robert Llewellyn has been photographing trees and landscapes for almost forty years. His photographs have been featured in major art exhibits, and more than thirty books featuring his photography are in print. His 2007 book, Empires of the Forest: Jamestown and the Beginning of America, won five national awards in nonfiction and photography, and his The Capital was an official diplomatic gift of the White House and State Department. Llewellyn honed his tree photography skills while working on Remarkable Trees of Virginia (2008), a four year project, creating landscape photographs that have been called "a spectacular tribute to Virginia's native trees." Seeing Trees showcases a new form of photography, however. Using software developed for work with microscopes, Llewellyn creates incredibly sharp close-ups by stitching together 8 to 45 images of each subject #8212; each shot at a different focal point.
 
Published November 3, 2011 by Timber Press. 245 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Science & Math, Crafts, Hobbies & Home, Sports & Outdoors. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Seeing Trees

Patheos

Seeing Trees, is a guide that will help us to do so, and as we begin to experiment with the attentive practices it describes, we will find that many of them are transferable to seeing, knowing and loving other facets of our immediate environment – plants, animals, architecture, etc.

Oct 30 2011 | Read Full Review of Seeing Trees: Discover the Ex...

Englewood Review of Books

Seeing Trees, is a guide that will help us to do so, and as we begin to experiment with the attentive practices it describes, we will find that many of them are transferable to seeing, knowing and loving other facets of our immediate environment – plants, animals, architecture, etc.

Oct 21 2011 | Read Full Review of Seeing Trees: Discover the Ex...

Reader Rating for Seeing Trees
95%

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