Sequoyah by James Rumford
The Cherokee Man Who Gave His People Writing (Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Honor (Awards))

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Synopsis

The story of Sequoyah is the tale of an ordinary man with an extraordinary idea—to create a writing system for the Cherokee Indians and turn his people into a nation of readers and writers. The task he set for himself was daunting. Sequoyah knew no English and had no idea how to capture speech on paper. But slowly and painstakingly, ignoring the hoots and jibes of his neighbors and friends, he worked out a system that surprised the Cherokee Nation—and the world of the 1820s—with its beauty and simplicity. James Rumford’s Sequoyah is a poem to celebrate literacy, a song of a people’s struggle to stand tall and proud.
 

About James Rumford

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Master storyteller James Rumford combines his love for art and history in his picture books. Each of his books is vastly different in its content, design, and illustrations but one aspect remains constant throughout his work: his passion about his subjects. Rumford, a resident of Hawaii, has studied more than a dozen languages and worked in the Peace Corps, where he traveled to Africa, Asia, and Afghanistan. He draws from these experiences and the history of his subject when he is working on a book. His book Sequoyah: The Cherokee Man Who Gave His People Writing was a 2005 Sibert Honor winner.
 
Published November 1, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 32 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Education & Reference, Children's Books.

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Kirkus Reviews

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This simply told tale imagines a parent addressing a child among the Giant Sequoias of California, moving in stately fashion from the trees to the Cherokee genius who invented a written language for his people.

| Read Full Review of Sequoyah: The Cherokee Man Wh...

Publishers Weekly

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Sequoyah knew no English and could not read, but invented a writing system for the Cherokee, believing that "Writing will make us strong."

Nov 08 2004 | Read Full Review of Sequoyah: The Cherokee Man Wh...

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