Sharpeville by Tom Lodge
An Apartheid Massacre and Its Consequences

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Synopsis

On 21 March 1960 several hundred black Africans were injured and 69 killed when South African police opened fire on demonstrators in the township of Sharpeville, protesting against the Apartheid regime's racist 'pass' laws. The Sharpeville Massacre, as the event has become known, signalled the start of armed resistance in South Africa, and prompted worldwide condemnation of South Africa's Apartheid policies. The events at Sharpeville deeply affected the attitudes of both black and
white in South Africa and provided a major stimulus to the development of an international 'Anti-Apartheid' movement.

In Sharpeville, Tom Lodge explains how and why the Massacre occurred, looking at the social and political background to the events of March 1960, as well as the sequence of events that prompted the shootings themselves. He then broadens his focus to explain the long-term consequences of Sharpeville, explaining how it affected South African politics over the following decades, both domestically and also in the country's relationship with the rest of the world.
 

About Tom Lodge

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Published May 12, 2011 by OUP Oxford. 444 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Sharpeville

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Lodge's study of the Sharpeville massacre is a meticulous but overstuffed history of the 1960 clash between black protestors and white policemen in the South African township of Sharpeville, which left 67 protestors dead and nearly 200 wounded, most shot in the back while running away.

Apr 04 2011 | Read Full Review of Sharpeville: An Apartheid Mas...

Scotsman.com

Sixty-nine were killed and hundreds wounded when, on 21 March, 1960, South African police fired into a crowd of peaceful demonstrators, prompting an international anti-apartheid movement – and three decades of dogged resistance in South Africa.

Jul 01 2011 | Read Full Review of Sharpeville: An Apartheid Mas...

Scotsman.com

Sixty-nine were killed and hundreds wounded when, on 21 March, 1960, South African police fired into a crowd of peaceful demonstrators, prompting an international anti-apartheid movement – and three decades of dogged resistance in South Africa.

Jul 01 2011 | Read Full Review of Sharpeville: An Apartheid Mas...

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