Siberian Education by Nicolai Lilin
Growing Up in a Criminal Underworld

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But rethought as a piece of semi-fictional anthropology and the story springs to life. Even if only one-tenth of it is true...Amid the depravity of its anti-heroes, "Siberian Education" paints a memorable world of anarchism, devotion, humor and respect.
-WSJ online

Synopsis

"Marvelous and Illuminating. . . . Forces us to reassess our notions of good and evil." —Irvine Welsh


In a contested, lawless region between Moldova and Ukraine known as Transnistria, a tightly knit group of “honest criminals” live according to strict codes of ritualized respect and fierce loyalty. In a voice utterly compelling and unforgettable, Nicolai Lilin, born and raised within this exotic subculture, tells the story of his moral education outside the bounds of “society” as we know it, where men uphold values with passion—and often by brute force.
 

About Nicolai Lilin

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Nicolai Lilin grew up in Transnistria, which declared its independence from Russia in 1990 but has never been recognized as a state. His previous book, Siberian Education, was also a bestseller in Europe and has been made into a movie with John Malkovich. Lilin lives in Milan, where he has founded an art gallery called Kolima Contemporary Culture.
 
Published April 11, 2011 by W. W. Norton & Company. 465 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Crime. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Siberian Education
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

WSJ online

Above average
Reviewed by Toby Lichtig on Aug 06 2010

But rethought as a piece of semi-fictional anthropology and the story springs to life. Even if only one-tenth of it is true...Amid the depravity of its anti-heroes, "Siberian Education" paints a memorable world of anarchism, devotion, humor and respect.

Read Full Review of Siberian Education: Growing U... | See more reviews from WSJ online

National Post arts

Above average
Reviewed by Richard Poplak on Nov 26 2010

Lalin’s book admits in its preface to “imaginative recreations;” elsewhere it has been published as a novel. Lalin is unlikely to have to issue a mea culpa on the Oprah couch, so his forthrightness is appreciated. Siberian Education exists in the no man’s land between memoir and roman à clef, a region more memoirists should own up to inhabiting.

Read Full Review of Siberian Education: Growing U... | See more reviews from National Post arts

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