Small Wars, Far Away Places by Michael Burleigh

60%

5 Critic Reviews

Mr. Burleigh writes with engaging wit, but rarely analyzes his complex insurgencies in depth. Had he chosen fewer subjects, he might have demonstrated the same insight as he brought to his earlier “The Third Reich.” Instead, Winston Churchill might have said of the current volume, “This pudding has no theme.”
-Washington Times

Synopsis

A sweeping history of the Cold War’s many “hot” wars born in the last gasps of empire 

The Cold War reigns in popular imagination as a period of tension between the two post-World War II superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union, without direct conflict. Drawing from new archival research, prize-winning historian Michael Burleigh gives new meaning to the seminal decades of 1945 to 1965 by examining the many, largely forgotten, “hot” wars fought around the world. As once-great Western colonial empires collapsed, counter-insurgencies campaigns raged in the Philippines, the Congo, Iran, and other faraway places. Dozens of new nations struggled into existence, the legacies of which are still felt today. Placing these vicious struggles alongside the period-defining United States and Soviet standoffs in Korea, Vietnam, and Cuba, Burleigh swerves from Algeria to Kenya, to Vietnam and Kashmir, interspersing top-level diplomatic negotiations with portraits of the charismatic local leaders. The result is a dazzling work of history, a searing analysis of the legacy of imperialism and a reminder of just how the United States became the world’s great enforcer.
 

About Michael Burleigh

See more books from this Author
Michael Burleigh, as of the fall of 2000, is a professor of history at Washington and Lee University. He is the author of six previous books on Germany, including Death and Deliverance and Ethics and Extermination.
 
Published April 11, 2013 by Macmillan. 608 pages
Genres: History, War, Travel. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Small Wars, Far Away Places
All: 5 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 2

Kirkus

Good
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on Jul 30 2013

Entertaining, informative and refreshingly devoid of partisan advocacy, Burleigh offers a persuasive explanation of how America assumed the mantle of policeman of the developing world.

Read Full Review of Small Wars, Far Away Places | See more reviews from Kirkus

NY Times

Good
Reviewed by Daniel Larison on Dec 27 2013

Burleigh concludes that the United States “profited little and lost much from its misconceived adoption of liberal imperialism.” But his book does a great deal to explain why Washington’s policy makers then — and perhaps now — couldn’t resist blundering into unnecessary small wars in faraway places.

Read Full Review of Small Wars, Far Away Places | See more reviews from NY Times

Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Ben Shephard on Apr 27 2013

...the book never quite hangs together and the serial narrative method it uses gradually exhausts both writer and reader.

Read Full Review of Small Wars, Far Away Places | See more reviews from Guardian

Financial Times

Good
Reviewed by Christopher Silvester on Apr 05 2013

Burleigh is an equal-opportunity moralist, not an ideologue, and he stalks his prey with feline grace.

Read Full Review of Small Wars, Far Away Places | See more reviews from Financial Times

Washington Times

Below average
Reviewed by John Taylor on Oct 30 2013

Mr. Burleigh writes with engaging wit, but rarely analyzes his complex insurgencies in depth. Had he chosen fewer subjects, he might have demonstrated the same insight as he brought to his earlier “The Third Reich.” Instead, Winston Churchill might have said of the current volume, “This pudding has no theme.”

Read Full Review of Small Wars, Far Away Places | See more reviews from Washington Times

Reader Rating for Small Wars, Far Away Places
77%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 23 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×