Snow by Orhan Pamuk

68%

8 Critic Reviews

I guess I liked it because I learned some new facts about Turkish culture and society, but aside from that, it wasn't too gripping, and the topic didn't excite me as much as other novels do.
-Blog Critics

Synopsis

Dread, yearning, identity, intrigue, the lethal chemistry between secular doubt and Islamic fanaticism–these are the elements that Orhan Pamuk anneals in this masterful, disquieting novel. An exiled poet named Ka returns to Turkey and travels to the forlorn city of Kars. His ostensible purpose is to report on a wave of suicides among religious girls forbidden to wear their head-scarves. But Ka is also drawn by his memories of the radiant Ipek, now recently divorced. Amid blanketing snowfall and universal suspicion, Ka finds himself pursued by figures ranging from Ipek’s ex-husband to a charismatic terrorist. A lost gift returns with ecstatic suddenness. A theatrical evening climaxes in a massacre. And finding god may be the prelude to losing everything else. Touching, slyly comic, and humming with cerebral suspense, Snow is of immense relevance to our present moment.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Orhan Pamuk

See more books from this Author
Orhan Pamuk won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2006. His novel My Name Is Red won the 2003 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. His work has been translated into more than fifty languages. He lives in Istanbul.
 
Published December 5, 2006 by Vintage. 480 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Action & Adventure, Political & Social Sciences. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Snow
All: 8 | Positive: 5 | Negative: 3

Kirkus

Above average
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on Jul 01 2010

Internationally acclaimed Turkish writer Pamuk (My Name is Red, 2001, etc) vividly embodies and painstakingly explores the collision of Western values with Islamic fundamentalism.

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Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Sarah Emily Miano on May 30 2008

So the players in the story, including Ka, are cast in a shadow of indeterminacy - which makes the novel even more compelling. Still, Pamuk manages to give voice to everyone involved: reactionaries, terrorists, liberals, fundamentalists.

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Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by James Buchan on May 29 2008

Pamuk's master here is Dostoevsky, but amid the desperate students, cafés, small shopkeepers, gunshots...are the trickeries familiar from modern continental fiction. The result is large and expansive, but, even at 436 pages, neither grand nor heavy.

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Blog Critics

Above average
Reviewed by Jeruen Dery on Jul 10 2011

I guess I liked it because I learned some new facts about Turkish culture and society, but aside from that, it wasn't too gripping, and the topic didn't excite me as much as other novels do.

Read Full Review of Snow | See more reviews from Blog Critics

Examiner

Above average
Reviewed by Natacha Pavlov on Feb 15 2012

Although it might be worth noting that this is not a happy book, it doesn’t mean that the reader won’t find himself getting attached to one or more of its characters.

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The Millions

Above average
Reviewed by Kevin Hartnett on Jan 03 2008

Snow is haunted by the specter of religious suicide and rife with the political strife that defines our time. Pamuk handles both thoughtfully and subtly...

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The New Yorker

Above average
Reviewed by John Updike on Aug 30 2008

Pamuk’s conscience-ridden and carefully wrought novel, tonic in its scope, candor, and humor, does not incite us, even in our imaginations, to overthrow existing conditions in Turkey.

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Spectator Book Club

Good
Reviewed by John de Falbe on May 08 2008

But what makes it a brilliant novel is its artistry. Pamuk keeps so many balls in the air that you cannot separate the inquiry into the nature of religious belief from the examination of modern Turkey...

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Reader Rating for Snow
63%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 284 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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