Sold Separately by Ellen Seiter
Children and Parents in Consumer Culture (Communications, Media, and Culture Series)

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Synopsis

"A radical approach to children's TV. . . . Seiter argues cogently that watching Saturday cartoons isn't a passive activity but a tool by which even the very young decode and learn about their culture, and develop creative imagination as well. Bolstered by social, political, developmental, and media research, Seiter ties middle class aversion to children's TV and mass-market toys to an association with the 'uncontrollable consumerism'--and hence supposed moral failure--of working class memebers, women, and 'increasingly children.' . . . Positive guidance for parents uncertain of the role of TV and TV toys in their children's lives." --Kirkus Review "In this thought-provoking study, Seiter reasonably urges parents and others to put aside their own tastes and to understand that children's consumer culture promotes solidarity and sociability among youngsters." --Publishers Weekly "An important book for those desiring an overview of the toy industry's impact on consumer culture . . . [it] provides a fair and well-balanced view of the industry." --Kathleen M. Carson, associate editor, Playthings
 

About Ellen Seiter

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Ellen Seiter is Professor of Communication at the University of California, San Diego. Her publications include Sold Separately: Children and Parents in Consumer Culture (1993) as well as numerous journal articles.
 
Published October 1, 1993 by Rutgers University Press. 278 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Political & Social Sciences, Children's Books, Parenting & Relationships. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Sold Separately

Kirkus Reviews

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Bolstered by social, political, developmental, and media research, Seiter ties middle-class aversion to children's TV and mass-market toys to an association with the ``uncontrollable consumerism''--and hence supposed moral failure--of working-class members, women, and ``increasingly, children.'' ...

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Publishers Weekly

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Seiter discusses the many genres of children's TV and toys, analyzing the My Little Pony and Ghostbusters cartoon series (marketed to girls and boys, respectively) and taking a detailed look at the giant chain store Toys R Us (which strictly segregates girls' and boys' toys).

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Project MUSE

She may not fully endorse television, but Seiter does recognize that children are not merely passive victims, that consumer culture provides images and themes for a shared culture among children, and that children often use these shared images to create new, unanticipated meanings, even to rebel ...

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