Solo by Hope Solo
A Memoir of Hope

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Solo’s book is interesting and well written; experienced journalist Ann Killion--who assisted Solo in the effort--has a deft touch with engaging prose at times.
-Soccer 365

Synopsis

"My family doesn't do happy endings. We do sad endings or frustrating endings or no endings at all. We are hardwired to expect the next interruption or disappearance or broken promise."

Hope Solo is the face of the modern female athlete. She is fearless, outspoken, and the best in the world at what she does: protecting the goal of the U.S. women's soccer team. Her outsized talent has led her to the pinnacle of her sport—the Olympics and the World Cup—and made her into an international celebrity who is just as likely to appear on ABC's Dancing with the Stars as she is on the covers of Sports Illustrated, ESPN The Magazine, and Vogue. But her journey—which began in Richland, Washington, where she was raised by her strong-willed mother on the scorched earth of defunct nuclear testing sites—is similarly haunted by the fallout of her family history. Her father, a philanderer and con man, was convicted of embezzlement when Solo was an infant. She lost touch with him as he drifted out of prison and into homelessness. By the time they reunited, years later, in the parking lot of a grocery store, she was an All-American goalkeeper at the University of Washington and already a budding prospect for the U.S. national team. He was living in the woods.

Despite harboring serious doubts even about the provenance of her father's last name (and her own), Solo embraces him as fiercely as she pursues her dreams of being a world-class soccer player. When those dreams are threatened by her standing within the national team, as when she was famously benched in the semifinals of the 2007 World Cup after four shutouts and spoke her piece publicly, we see a woman of uncompromising independence and hard-won perseverance navigate the petty backlash against her. For the first time, she tells her version of that controversial episode, and offers with it a full understanding of her hard-scrabble life.

Moving, sometimes shocking, Solo is a portrait of an athlete finding redemption. This is the Hope Solo whom few have ever glimpsed.

Signed poster inside.

 

About Hope Solo

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An Olympic gold medalist, Hope Solo has been a member of the U.S. national soccer team since 2000, gracing the cover of Sports Illustrated and ESPN The Magazine. At the 2011 World Cup, she was awarded the Adidas Golden Glove by FIFA as the tournament's top goalkeeper. A prominent spokesperson for Gatorade, Nike, and Seiko, she also starred on TV's hit reality show Dancing with the Stars. On February 14, 2012, it was announced that Solo had signed with the Seattle Sounders of the women's professional W-League.
 
Published June 18, 2013 by Harper. 320 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Sports & Outdoors. Non-fiction
Bestseller Status:
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Peak Rank on Sep 02 2012
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Weeks as Bestseller
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Critic reviews for Solo
All: 4 | Positive: 4 | Negative: 0

BuffaloNews.com

Excellent
Reviewed by Gene Warner on Sep 16 2012

The book reveals exactly who and what she is: a strong, outspoken, sometimes brazen athlete, who also can be shy, an insecure product of an often dysfunctional State of Washington family.

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Bleacher Report

Excellent
Reviewed by Nathan McCarter on Aug 16 2012

It is the captivating tale of her upbringing that truly reels you in to Solo's journey. The star goalkeeper opens up about her father, mother and everyone else close to her.

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Soccer 365

Good
Reviewed by Tim Grainey on Sep 14 2012

Solo’s book is interesting and well written; experienced journalist Ann Killion--who assisted Solo in the effort--has a deft touch with engaging prose at times.

Read Full Review of Solo: A Memoir of Hope

espnW

Good
Reviewed by Graham Hays on Aug 20 2012

Her willingness to reveal that kind of conflict, without clear resolution and in all its messiness, makes it possible to get a sense of a person.

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Reader Rating for Solo
87%

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