Something For Nothing by Kevin FitzMaurice

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Synopsis

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How To Discover Insight by practicing the discernment of sayings.How To Exercise and Improve Your Mind for greater openness, flexibility, and creativity.How To Increase Your Mental Capability by increasing your capacity for understanding, perception, and wisdom.This book is a compilation of sayings useful to understanding Eastern thought and General Semantics. The agreement between General Semantics and Eastern philosophy is profound, illuminating, and deepens the understanding of both.
For instance, the expressions, "The description is not the described," and, "The thought is not the thing," are found in both Eastern philosophy and General Semantics. Both systems arrive at reality as nonverbal, silent, and beyond comprehension with thought. This despite the fact that one is spiritual and one is atheistic. Two entirely different approaches arriving at the same ultimate conclusions is exciting and enlightening.
You will find the sayings herein amusing, helpful, interesting, and thought provoking. Many of the sayings are like Zen koans; if you sit with them, they reveal the other side free of words. Many of the sayings are open to multiple interpretations and meanings. New meanings will arrive on different journeys through the book. The same insight shared different ways helps you not to miss deeper felt experiences for simple surface meanings. It often happens that a slight change in wording allows someone to drop their mind long enough to hear something fresh. One person's, "that's obvious," is another person's "ah-ha" moment. Let the sayings pass that don't open to you now. Focus on the sayings that bring stillness. Listen beyond the words. Feel, rather than think, the sayings through. Sense, rather than think, the music behind the words.If you are not familiar with Eastern thought, the word "nothing" can have a profoundly positive meaning. For instance, "nothing" can mean the unknowable creative source of everything. Eastern philosophy has two major divisions; one that has gods, and one that has a void instead of gods. The word "nothing" in this book often refers to this invisible, unfathomable, and all-powerful Eastern void. The word "void" is also to be considered positive in the Eastern philosophy sense. Perhaps, because of the negative connotations of the words "void" or "nothing", the Western mind would do better to think of "positive pure-energy" in place of void and nothing.The word "nothing" in this book can have many meanings other than zero: emptiness, empty space, formless energy, God, invisible power, no thing, no things as referents, no thoughts, no thoughts as referents, no thoughts being what they only represent, not thinging, self as space, the creative source, the ineffable, the life force, the nature of being, the positive Eastern void, the way of life. Try considering the word "nothing" as a shortened form of the two words "not thinging"!The word "something" in this book mainly refers to: conceptualizing, concretizing, ideas, images, labels, making thoughts into reality, names, objectifying, reification, some thought, some thought-thing, terms, thingifying, thought as delusion, thought as illusion, thought pretending to be the real, thoughts as what they represent, thought-things, treating thoughts as things. Try considering the word "something" as a shortened form of the two words "some thought-thing"!
 

About Kevin FitzMaurice

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 Be it as a person's counselor or as a founding member of facilities for the homeless, Kevin Everett FitzMaurice, M.S., NCC, CCMHC, LPC, seeks to make others' lives better by helping others improve how they function. As a volunteer, he supports community services to improve others' living conditions. As a counselor, he "counsels" in the traditional sense: advising, directing, and nudging--or pushing--others into facing and resolving their issues. Mr. FitzMaurice has a variety of formal and advanced training in counseling, which includes Addictions Counseling, Family Therapy, advanced Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT), Transactional Analysis (TA), and over 1300 hours of diverse training for continuing education units (CEUs). To make the best use of that extensive training, he takes an integrative approach, grounding himself in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and using the other theories to build upon that one core theory, rather than focusing on multiple theories and mastering none of them. After more than twenty years in counseling, Mr. FitzMaurice has worked four years in the substance abuse field, directed two community mental health programs, and spent fourteen years counseling in private practice. In that time, he has refined many principles for and methods of counseling. He now puts those principles and methods into book form to share them with a wider audience, so more people can benefit than he can reach in person. Currently, he has more than twenty books written, most of which are available worldwide as e-books from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, and Apple. The philosophical odyssey of Mr. FitzMaurice began in the late '60s. It has remained a mostly self-taught pursuit, with little formal training or education in philosophy. The odyssey started with Western philosophy and a study of pragmatism and atheism. For example, he read every work of Nietzsche that had been translated into English at that time. From there, he moved to the study of Zen, Buddhism, Hinduism, and a misguided experimentation with psychedelics to achieve states of superconsciousness. He continued into Eastern philosophy, pursuing Taoism and J. Krishnamurti. Next came a study of Christianity that started with seven readings of the Old Testament and nine readings of the New Testament from cover to cover, followed by a formal study of Western psychology. The ongoing influences for FitzMaurice's thinking continue to be Christianity, General Semantics, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and an Eastern combination of J. Krishnamurti, Taoism, and Zen. Academic Credentials: Master of Science (M.S.) in guidance and counseling, with a specialization in agency counseling, from the University of Nebraska. Associate of applied science in human services - chemical dependency counseling (with honors), from Metropolitan Community College. National Certifications: National Certified Counselor (NCC); Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC); Family Certification in REBT; Primary Certification in REBT; and Advanced Certification in REBT. State Licensure: Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in Oregon; Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) in Iowa; Licensed Independent Mental Health Practitioner (LIMHP) in Nebraska. Community Service: One of the original founders of the Francis House, Siena House, and Stephen Center homeless facilities still in operation in Nebraska. Supporter of the following charities: OxFam America, Amnesty International USA, Habitat for Humanity, and Green Peace.
 
Published June 22, 2011 by FitzMaurice Publishers. 241 pages
Genres: Religion & Spirituality.

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