Sophocles' Antigone by Sophocles
(Greek Tragedies Retold)

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Synopsis

The enduring story of Antigone--the Greek princess who braved the wrath of a king and sacrificed her own life in order to honor her slain brother--is retold here for contemporary readers.
Through the words of the blind prophet Teiresias, we watch the inevitable tragedy unfold as Antigone discovers that her brother, a rebel against the rule of their uncle Creon, has been murdered and his body left unburied. Torn between duty to her uncle the king, love for her brother, and her duty to the gods, Antigone symbolizes the often tragic conflict between love and duty, honor and the law.
This modern retelling of the story, best known through Sophocles' drama, is enhanced by original illustrations in the style of ancient Greek art silk-screened on handmade paper. Truly a unique and beautiful book, Sophocles' Antigone will be a treasured addition to the libraries of those who love the arts of ancient Greece and of fine, contemporary bookmaking.
 

About Sophocles

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The Greek dramatist Sophocles, born to a wealthy family at Colonus, near Athens, was admired as a boy for his personal beauty and musical skill. He served faithfully as a treasurer and general for Athens when it was expanding its empire and influence. In the dramatic contests, he defeated Aeschylus in 468 b.c. for first prize in tragedy, wrote a poem to Herodotus (see Vol. 3), and led his chorus and actors in mourning for Euripides just a few months before his own death. He wrote approximately 123 plays, of which 7 tragedies are extant, as well as a fragment of his satiric play, Ichneutae (Hunters). His plays were produced in the following order: Ajax (c.450 b.c.), Antigone (441 b.c.), Oedipus Tyrannus (c.430 b.c.), Trachiniae (c.430 b.c.), Electra (between 418 and 410 b.c.), Philoctetes (409 b.c.), and Oedipus at Colonus (posthumously in 401 b.c.). With Sophocles, Greek tragedy reached its most characteristic form. He added a third actor, made each play independent---that is, not dependent on others in a trilogy---increased the numbers of the chorus, introduced the use of scenery, shifted the focus from religious to more philosophical issues, and brought language and characters, though still majestic, nearer to everyday life. His finely delineated characters are responsible for the tragedy that befalls them, and they accept it heroically. Aristotle (see Vols. 3, 4, and 5) states that Sophocles said he portrayed people as they ought to be; Euripides, as they are. His utter command of tragic speech in the simple grandeur of his choral odes, dialogues, and monologues encourages the English reader to compare him to Shakespeare (see Vol. 1). An exciting voice in contemporary Indian writing, Sirish Rao has authored over eighteen books, ranging from novels to children's books, re-tellings of myths to pop art collections. HIs books have won international awards and have been translated into several languages. His writing reflects his interest in nature, mountaineering, travel, eccentric people and the oddities of language. The illustrator, Indrapramit Roy, is an artist and professor of art history. He lives in India.
 
Published October 11, 2001 by J. Paul Getty Museum. 28 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Sophocles' Antigone

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Equipped with absurdist twists, the 18 short stories of Dreams, Demons and Desire by British novelist Wendy Perriam (Lying, etc.) are simply written tales of modern (and not so modern) malaise. In

Oct 08 2001 | Read Full Review of Sophocles' Antigone (Greek Tr...

Publishers Weekly

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Every era needs the classics on its own terms, so Sophocles' Electra, translated by Anne Carson (The Beauty of the Husband;

| Read Full Review of Sophocles' Antigone (Greek Tr...

Publishers Weekly

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Equipped with absurdist twists, the 18 short stories of Dreams, Demons and Desire by British novelist Wendy Perriam (Lying, etc.) are simply written tales of modern (and not so modern) malaise.

| Read Full Review of Sophocles' Antigone (Greek Tr...

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