Sorceress by Celia Rees
(Witch Child)

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Synopsis

The suspense is over! Readers of the spellbinding story of Mary Newbury can finally find out what happens to her next - thanks to a young, modern-day descendant who has an uncanny connection to the past.

Agnes closed her eyes in the heat and steam of the sweat lodge. She woke to air that was dry and cold around her. She was no longer Agnes, or even Karonhisake, Searching Sky. She was no longer American or Haudenosaunee. She was English, and her name was Mary, and she woke to find that she was dying, freezing to death.

It came to Agnes unbidden - a vision of Mary Newbury, alone in the snow, dying of the cold. A vision of a young woman who had lived in the 1600s,
an unusual young woman who had been driven from her Puritan settlement, accused of being a witch. It was an image of a woman whose life was about to change radically, as she embarked on an existence that defied all accepted norms - embracing passionate independence, love, and loyalty to a proud, endangered community that accepted her as one of their own.

Mary’s and Agnes’s lives have been separated by almost 400 years, but they are inextricably linked by more than blood. Like Mary, Agnes has special powers - powers that Mary now seeks to ensure that the rest of her story is told.
 

About Celia Rees

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CELIA REES is the author of many acclaimed and bestselling books for young readers including the Witch Child, Sorceress, Pirates!, Sovay, and The Fool's Girl, and her books have been translated into more than twenty languages. Celia lives in England.www.celiarees.com
 
Published May 12, 2009 by Candlewick. 352 pages
Genres: Religion & Spirituality, Young Adult, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Horror. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Sorceress

Publishers Weekly

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A Native American teen experiences a life-altering encounter after reading about Mary Newbury, the 17th-century protagonist of Rees's Witch Child, who may be connected with one of her own relatives.

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Publishers Weekly

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A Native American teen experiences a life-altering encounter after reading about Mary Newbury the 17th-century protagonist of Witch Child who may be connected with one of her own relatives, in Sorceress by Celia Rees.

| Read Full Review of Sorceress (Witch Child)

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