Spring by David Szalay
A Novel

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The work of a sophisticated, quietly original writer, Spring is the antithesis of a romantic comedy – and is all the better for it.
-Guardian

Synopsis

The U.S. debut of leading U.K. author David Szalay, named one of The Daily Telegraph's twenty best British novelists under forty

James is a man with a checkered past—sporadic entrepreneur, one-time film producer, almost a dot-com millionaire—now alone in a flat in Bloomsbury, running a shady horse-racing-tips operation. Katherine is a manager at a luxury hotel, a job she'd intended to leave years ago, and is separated from her husband. The novel unfolds in 2006, at the end of the money-for-nothing years, as a chance meeting leads to an awkward tryst and James tries to make sense of a relationship where "no" means "maybe" and a "yes" can never be taken for granted.

David Szalay builds a novel of immense resonance as he cycles though perspectives that add layers of depth to the hesitations, missteps, and tensions as James tries to win Katherine. James's other pursuit is money, and Spring follows his investments and schemes, from a half share in a thoroughbred to a suit-and-tie day job he's taken to pay the bills. Spring is a sharply tuned novel so nuanced and precise in its psychology that it establishes Szalay as a major talent.

 

About David Szalay

See more books from this Author
David Szalay was born in Canada in 1974. His first novel, London and the South-East, won the Betty Trask Prize and the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize. His second novel, The Innocent, was published by Jonathan Cape in 2009. He lives in London.
 
Published January 17, 2012 by Graywolf Press. 271 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Erotica. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Spring
All: 3 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 2

Guardian

Excellent
Reviewed by William Skidelsky on Mar 31 2012

The work of a sophisticated, quietly original writer, Spring is the antithesis of a romantic comedy – and is all the better for it.

Read Full Review of Spring: A Novel | See more reviews from Guardian

National Post arts

Below average
Reviewed by Kevin Chong on Feb 17 2012

...narratives about love affairs are most stirring when stylized...set in a distant tim...or placed in the backdrop of a war...but when they are too familiar...they inspire boredom and revulsion. Spring might fall because it’s too true to life.

Read Full Review of Spring: A Novel | See more reviews from National Post arts

National Post arts

Below average
Reviewed by Kevin Chong on Feb 17 2012

When they bear a passing resemblance to humans, machines are cute. But as these representations become more lifelike (i.e. like mannequins), they are seen to be grotesque...Spring might fall because it’s too true to life.

Read Full Review of Spring: A Novel | See more reviews from National Post arts

Reader Rating for Spring
60%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 31 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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