Stone Thrower by Adam Marek

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It makes you relish the possibility that sooner or later Marek might indulge his talent for bleak futurism in the roomier confines of a novel.
-Guardian

Synopsis

A bold voice in absurdist short fiction Intelligent clothing, superhero dictators, contagion-carrying computer games, cross-species reproduction. Welcome to the strange and startling world of Adam Marek; a menagerie of futuristic technology, sinister traditions, and scientifically grounded superpowers — a place where the absurd and the mundane are not merely bedfellows, but interbreed. At the core of Adam Marek’s much-anticipated second short story collection is a single, unifying theme: a parent’s instinct to protect a particularly vulnerable child. Whether set amid unnerving visions of the near-future or grounded in the domestic here-and-now, these stories demonstrate that, sometimes, only outright surrealism can do justice to the merciless strangeness of reality, that only the fantastically illogical can steel us against what ordinary life threatens. Bonus BackLit materials will include an interview and a list of Marek’s recommended books.
 

About Adam Marek

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Adam Marek is a writer who won the 2010 Arts Foundation Short Story Fellowship and was shortlisted for the inaugural Sunday Times EFG Private Bank Short Story Award.
 
Published April 1, 2013 by ECW Press. 203 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Stone Thrower
All: 3 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Anthony Cummins on Oct 06 2012

It makes you relish the possibility that sooner or later Marek might indulge his talent for bleak futurism in the roomier confines of a novel.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Alfred Hickling on Sep 18 2012

With his uncompromising economy of style, Marek's angle of approach may occasionally seem oblique, yet, like the elusive chicken-assassin, he hits the target every time.

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Toronto Star

Good
Reviewed by Stephen Finucan on May 24 2013

...Marek counts among his influences J. G. Ballard and Etgar Keret. There is something of each in the worlds he creates. Indeed, one might even say that Marek is their slightly afflicted literary offspring, an odd little lad to be taken to our bosom.

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