Stone's Fall by Iain Pears
A Novel

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Stone's Fall zips along as a thriller. The first part, especially, is never a slow-boiling, watched plot, but a steadily simmering, action-filled story, almost like a screenplay in its scenes and movement.
-Globe and Mail

Synopsis

At his London home, John Stone falls out of a window to his death. A financier and arms dealer, Stone was a man so wealthy that he was able to manipulate markets, industries, and indeed entire countries and continents. Did he jump, was he pushed, or was it merely a tragic accident? His alluring and enigmatic widow hires a young crime reporter to investigate. The story moves backward in time—from London in 1909 to Paris in 1890 and finally to Venice in 1867—and the attempts to uncover the truth play out against the backdrop of the evolution of high-stakes international finance, Europe’s first great age of espionage, and the start of the twentieth century’s arms race. Stone’s Fall is a tale of love and frailty, as much as it is of high finance and skulduggery. The mixture, then, as now, is an often fatal combination.
 

About Iain Pears

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Iain Pears is the author of the New York Times bestseller An Instance of the Fingerpost and The Portrait. He lives in Oxford, England.
 
Published April 25, 2009 by Spiegel & Grau. 610 pages
Genres: History, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction, Romance. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Stone's Fall
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Globe and Mail

Excellent
Reviewed by BRIAN GIBSON on Aug 23 2012

Stone's Fall zips along as a thriller. The first part, especially, is never a slow-boiling, watched plot, but a steadily simmering, action-filled story, almost like a screenplay in its scenes and movement.

Read Full Review of Stone's Fall: A Novel | See more reviews from Globe and Mail

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