Stoo Hample's Book of Bad Manners by Stoo Hample

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Synopsis

From the sultan of silly comes a comical, kid-friendly guide to avoiding naughty behavior.

The Toy Hog. The Blabbermouth. The Food Face, the Belcher, and (shudder) the Nose Picker. They're all here, and more - a veritable rogues' gallery of the rudest, crudest, meanest manners found wherever children slurp, grab, desert the table, or cut in line. With his trademark retro artwork and hilarious running commentary, Stoo Hample teaches children good manners by example - of what not to do - and bolsters his case with a final broad hint that the reader who fails to take heed may soon be the star of a book just like this one.
 

About Stoo Hample

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Stoo Hample is the author-illustrator of THE SILLY BOOK, first published to great acclaim in 1961 and reissued by Candlewick Press in 2004, to still more acclaim. I WILL KISS YOU (LOTS & LOTS & LOTS!) followed in 2006. He lives in New York City.
 
Published August 8, 2006 by Candlewick. 40 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Young Adult.

Unrated Critic Reviews for Stoo Hample's Book of Bad Manners

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“Food-Face” talks with her mouth full, so, “Whoever’s beside her / Is very unlucky, / ’Cause being so close / Is gross—and quite yucky!” Closing with a less-than-effective threat—“If you’re equally awful, / Not nice or polite, / You’ll be in the next / Book like this that I write”—these bad examp...

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Publishers Weekly

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The literary equivalent of a child's giggle fit, Stoo Hample's The Silly Book (1961), originally edited by Ursula Nordstrom, was a humor reference point for countless knee-high baby boomers.

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Publishers Weekly

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The spare ink cartoons, in a limited palette of brown-grays, pale yellows and reds, often include a small vignette of the artist at his drawing board or reacting to the scene (e.g., he's keels over in response to ""Stinker"": ""This angel-faced girl/ Thinks it's funny and smart/ To smile and secr...

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