Stravinsky's Lunch by Drusilla Modjeska

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 3 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

A moving, deeply insightful study of two artists-both twentieth-century Australian women-who lived and worked in divergent realms

Drusilla Modjeska's title derives from an anecdote about the composer who, while creating a piece of music, ordered his family to remain silent while taking a meal with him-so Stravinsky could preserve his concentration on his work. Modjeska's book investigates the life patterns of women artists, most of whom have been unable to manage such a neat compartmentalization of daily life and creativity.

Stravinsky's Lunch tells the stories of two extraordinary women, both born close to the turn of the century in Australia and both destined to make important contributions to Australian painting. Stella Bowen went to London to make her career, then became a bohemian and the longtime mistress of Ford Madox Ford. Grace Cossington Smith, a spinster who never strayed far from her childhood home on the outskirts of Sydney, became one of the first Australian modernists. Their distinctive stories speak volumes about how love, art, and life intersect.
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
 

About Drusilla Modjeska

See more books from this Author
Drusilla Modjeska is an Australian writer whose previous books include Poppy and The Orchard.
 
Published January 1, 1999 by Picador. 364 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Arts & Photography. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Stravinsky's Lunch

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Yes No By clicking on "Submit"...

| Read Full Review of Stravinsky's Lunch

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Both were modernist painters who crafted substantial bodies of work, with Bowen painting impressionistic portraits of expatriate writers and the French countryside, and Smith turning out lapidary studies that recall both Whistler and Chagall.

| Read Full Review of Stravinsky's Lunch

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

(Readers may be less convinced.) Unfortunately, the lack of analysis is compounded by a glut of spectacularly banal filler, e.g., when Modjeska states, ""The forties are powerful years in a woman's life, but such sweetness as there is, is mixed with the tart taste of time passing."" The title ref...

| Read Full Review of Stravinsky's Lunch

Rate this book!

Add Review