Students by Carol Dyhouse

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Synopsis

This compelling and stimulating book explores the gendered social history of students in modern Britain.

From the privileged youth of Brideshead Revisited, to the scruffs at 'Scumbag University' in The Young Ones, representations of the university undergraduate have been decidedly male. But since the 1970s the proportion of women students in universities in the UK has continued to rise so that female undergraduates now outnumber their male counterparts.

Drawing upon wide-ranging original research including documentary and archival sources, newsfilm, press coverage of student life and life histories of men and women who graduated before the Second World War, this text provides rich insights into changes in student identity and experience over the past century.

The book examines :


men's and women's differing expectations of higher education
the sacrifices that families made to send young people to college
the effect of equality legislation
demography
changing patterns of marriage and the impact of the 'sexual revolution' on female students
the cultural life of students and the role that gender has played in shaping them.

For students of gender studies, cultural studies and history, this book will have meaningful impact on their degree course studies.

 

About Carol Dyhouse

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Carol Dyhouse is a social historian and currently a research professor of history at the University of Sussex. Her most recent book, Glamour: Women, History, Feminism was published by Zed Books in 2010. Longer term, her research has focussed on gender, education and the pattern of women's lives in nineteenth and twentieth century Britain. Her books include Girls Growing Up in late Victorian and Edwardian England; Feminism and the Family in England, 1890-1939; No Distinction of Sex? Women in British Universities, 1870-1939; and Students: A Gendered History.
 
Published October 2, 2012 by Routledge. 289 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

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