Submarine by JOE DUNTHORNE
A Novel

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Synopsis

BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Joe Dunthorne's Wild Abandon.

At once a self-styled social scientist, a spy in the baffling adult world, and a budding, hormone-driven emotional explorer, Oliver Tate is stealthily nosing his way forward through the murky and uniquely perilous waters of adolescence. His objectives? Uncovering the secrets behind his parents’ teetering marriage, unraveling the mystery that is his alluring and equally quirky classmate Jordana Bevan, and understanding where he fits in among the mystifying beings in his orbit. Struggling to buoy his parents’ wedded bliss, deep-six his own virginity, and sound the depths of heartache, happiness, and the business of being human, what’s a lad to do? Poised precariously on the cusp of innocence and experience, Oliver Tate aims to damn the torpedoes and take the plunge.

Now a major motion picture.
 

About JOE DUNTHORNE

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Joe Dunthorne's first novel, Submarine, has been translated into ten languages and made into a feature film. His debut poetry collection was published in 2010. He lives in London.
 
Published March 25, 2008 by Random House. 322 pages
Genres: Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Submarine

Kirkus Reviews

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the marriage of Oliver’s parents is going through a rough patch, and they haven’t had sex in months.) Oliver’s mother Jill goes to a meditation retreat run by an old friend, Graham, a New Age type who Oliver believes is bent on seducing her.

Feb 15 2008 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The New York Times

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It may tell you everything you need to know to note that one of Oliver’s favorite books is “The Catcher in the Rye,” that he has a drawing of a young Woody Allen tacked to his bedroom wall, and that his idea of a date movie is “The Passion of Joan of Arc.” It says a lot about the world imagined b...

Jun 02 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The New York Times

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She’s too good for me, she’s too good for anyone!” Oliver doesn’t always understand the line between mockery and humor or, for that matter, between empathy and condescension — which I think is Dunthorne’s point: teenage boys can be really dumb.

Jun 15 2008 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The Guardian

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Whether he is well-meaning or not - and he is both, at different times - young Oliver is a bit of a mess.

Mar 01 2008 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The Guardian

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Submarine by Joe Dunthorne Buy it from the Guardian bookshop Search the Guardian bookshop Oliver Tate is a 15-year-old pedant who considers himself an excellent jud...

Jan 31 2009 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The Guardian

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he is led by his peers but chastened by guilt: he can't resist being part of the gang that steals a fat girl's diary, but then, when she changes schools as a result, he writes her a self-help manual with tips on how to avoid bullying: 'You must be willing to transform any facet of your personalit...

Feb 17 2008 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

Suite 101

A graduate of NYU's Tisch School of Arts, filmmaker Jane Ji has been involved in many projects, but none as intimately as her thesis film, Line & Sinker.

Apr 04 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The Bookbag

Clearly I can't repeat seventeen of Joe Dunthorne's one-liners - gag stealing is a rotten crime, and I'd ruin all the best moments - but this should tell you that Submarine is laugh-out-loud funny.

Oct 24 2009 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

Chicago Tribune

The film never goes soft on Oliver, who is a yutz — perpetually spying, weaseling, self-aggrandizing — yet never dull.

Jun 09 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

Boston.com

“Submarine’’ careens along at a hormonal pace, with Oliver’s voice-overs dispensing winsome self-justifications (“I found a book on teenage paranoid delusions during a routine search of my parents’ bedroom’’) while melodramatic movie music surges on the soundtrack and the hero moves from an obses...

Jun 17 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

Time Magazine

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“Sometimes I wish there were a camera crew following my every move,” Oliver says, and Ayoade treats the viewer to the boy’s own imagined super-8 masterpiece, an Jordanaian idyll called Two Weeks of Love.

Jun 03 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The Hollywood Reporter

Joe Dunthorne's delightfully idiosyncratic 2008 novel "Submarine" is the kind of book that almost never is made into a film of matching quality.

Oct 14 2010 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

Nashville Public Library

“When I am very sad, I tend toward symbolism,” reveals Welsh teen Oliver Tate, the character at the center of Submarine, as he navigates the path he used to walk with his now ex-girlfriend.

Jul 26 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The Paris Review

TAGS Analyze This, Big Love, Boardwalk Empire, Bruce Springsteen, Chloe Sevigny, Crosby Hotel, Es Street Band, FBI, film, Frank “The Fixer” Tagliano, Goodfellas, Guest of a Guest, Harvey Weinstein, HBO, House of Cards, Lillehammer, Lilyhammer, Michael Shannon, mob, Netflix, Norway, Paulie Walnuts...

Nov 21 2014 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The Paris Review

In the book, it’s when Oliver gets his comeuppance for being a bit of a shit, so it’s important in terms of his “coming of age,” but for the film it felt too peripheral.

Jun 03 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The Paris Review

In the book, it’s when Oliver gets his comeuppance for being a bit of a shit, so it’s important in terms of his “coming of age,” but for the film it felt too peripheral.

Jun 03 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

The Paris Review

I’d say the same goes for the film version of Submarine versus the novel: in both cases, it seems key that the directors were bold enough to push out from the novels—in order to make good films, primarily, but also to capture something of the original.

Jun 03 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

OneMetal

And yes, if the only films you’ve ever seen are this and Rushmore, you’ll probably think Submarine bears a resemblance to Wes Anderson films.

Mar 23 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

San Francisco Weekly

That paradox of self-awareness is something Submarine, adapted by Ayoade from Joe Dunthorne's 2008 novel, itself archly exploits, unabashedly referencing the celebrated likes of Rushmore and The Graduate while angling for a sensibility — and attendant cool-kid cult — of its own.

Jun 08 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

HitFix

Related Searches: Submarine, Sundance Film Festival, Richard Ayoade, Joe Dunthorne, coming-of-age, Craig Roberts, Sally Hawkins, Noah Taylor, Paddy Considine, review

Jun 07 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

Scotsman.com

A hit debut novel which then transferred to cinema has put Joe Dunthorne at the centre of new writing...

Aug 18 2011 | Read Full Review of Submarine: A Novel

Reader Rating for Submarine
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