THE MOVIEGOER by Walker Percy

80%

7 Critic Reviews

It is an unaccented but tantalizing projection of the suspension of self in a limbo without responsibility- without reality, and there will be those who will find that this kind of "dark pilgrimage" . . . is curiously fascinating.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

Kate's desperate struggle to maintain her sanity forces her cousin Binx to relinquish his dreamworld
 

About Walker Percy

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Walker Percy, born in Alabama, raised in Mississippi, and a former resident of Louisiana, was a member of a prominent Southern family who lost his parents at an early age and grew up as the foster son of his father's cousin. Percy graduated from the University of North Carolina and received his M.D. from Columbia, but was a nonpracticing physician who devoted much of his life to his writing. Percy's witty and provocative first novel, The Moviegoer (1961), won the 1962 National Book Award, but Charles Poore considers The Last Gentleman (1966) "an even better book." Love in the Ruins (1971) marks a sharp change in method and subject from the first two novels. A doomsday story set "at the end of the Auto Age," it exposes many foibles and abuses in contemporary life through sharp satire and extravagant fantasy. Whereas Love in the Ruins is funny, Percy's next novel, Lancelot (1977) is the rather bleak and pessimistic story of a deranged man who blows up his home when he finds proof of his wife's infidelities and then tells his story in an asylum for the mentally disturbed. Its apocalyptic vision is expressed in a more positive and affirmative way in The Second Coming (1980), which takes its title from the fact that it resurrects the character of Will Barret from The Last Gentleman and locates him, a quarter-century older, finding love and meaning in a cave.
 
Published by Vintage Books.
Genres: . Fiction
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Critic reviews for THE MOVIEGOER
All: 7 | Positive: 5 | Negative: 2

Kirkus

Good
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on Nov 01 2011

It is an unaccented but tantalizing projection of the suspension of self in a limbo without responsibility- without reality, and there will be those who will find that this kind of "dark pilgrimage" . . . is curiously fascinating.

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Blog Critics

Above average
Reviewed by David Mazzotta on Dec 08 2008

Certainly an excellent portrayal of the combination of thoughtfulness and fecklessness that is common in unattached, mildly cynical, 30-year-old males . . . but it is difficult to get a grip on . . . I can't really recommend it for a casual read.

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Examiner

Excellent
Reviewed by Peter Kelton on Jan 20 2009

Wry and wrenching, rich in irony and romance.

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The Millions

Excellent
Reviewed by Jim Santel on Aug 24 2011

Catch-22 had been important to me as a student of literature, and Revolutionary Road had been important to my early development as a writer. But The Moviegoer was important to me as a human being. Like few other books I’ve ever read, it changed me.

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The Millions

Excellent
Reviewed by Max Magee on Jul 20 2008

It’s short and cleverly written . . . it has a lot more depth than some other books of middle-aged male suburban angst that I’ve read over the years.

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Bookslut

Good
Reviewed by Christopher Merkel on Sep 01 2010

The Moviegoer is more than just Southern charm . . . The Moviegoer, after nearly five decades of who knows how many write-ups, deserves another review because The Moviegoer is now, more than ever.

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Gather Books

Below average
Reviewed by PT D on Oct 10 2008

This is the kind of book I finish reading and have to begin a search of my own . . . because I put this down after reading the last page and did not see the point.

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Reader Rating for THE MOVIEGOER
67%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 161 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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