THUNDERSHINE by David Skinner
Tales of Metakids

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Synopsis

"Where do our powers come from? What are they, really? We're not doing tricks, Jake. These arent tricks. These are miracles. Real miracles."

When Jenny draws an untrue map, the world changes to conform. Mae, for some reason, walks wherever she goes, although everyone else bops, or teleports, at will. Dexter can spray-paint his thoughts onto walls -- which attracts the attention of Meredith, who talks to the planet Pluto. And Nina, who can give any power she wants to her brother, to his friends, and to herself, refuses to save a neighborhood boy from death.

These are metakids: kids who are kids...and more besides.

Following his acclaimed novel The Wrecker, David Skinner triumphs with the metaworld of Thundershine. Each of these four stories gives its own marvelous and often surprising answer to the question: What is it like, after all, to have a superpower?

 

About David Skinner

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David Skinner is a writer and editor living in Alexandri David Skinner is a writer and editor living in Alexandria, Virginia. He writes about language, culture, and his lifea, Virginia. He writes about language, culture, and his life as a husband, father, and suburbanite. He has been a staff as a husband, father, and suburbanite. He has been a staff editor at the "Weekly Standard", for which he still writes, editor at the "Weekly Standard", for which he still writes, and an editor of "Doublethink" magazine. He has written for and an editor of "Doublethink" magazine. He has written for the "Wall Street Journal", the "New Atlantis", "Slate", the"the "Wall Street Journal", the "New Atlantis", "Slate", the" Washington Times", the "American Spectator", and many other Washington Times", the "American Spectator", and many other publications. Skinner is the editor of Humanities magazine, publications. Skinner is the editor of Humanities magazine, which is published by the National Endowment for the Humani which is published by the National Endowment for the Humanities, and is on the usage panel for the "American Heritage Dties, and is on the usage panel for the "American Heritage Dictionary". ictionary".
 
Published June 1, 1999 by Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing. 128 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for THUNDERSHINE

Kirkus Reviews

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In a well-written gambol through weirdness, Skinner (The Wrecker, 1995, etc.) offers four highly imaginative short stories about young people with supernatural powers.

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Publishers Weekly

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The darkest and most fully developed selection in the collection, the story probes into the sources, repercussions and ethics of supernatural abilities.

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