Taipei by Tao Lin
(Vintage Contemporaries Original)

70%

8 Critic Reviews

Here we have a serious, first-rate novelist putting all his skills to work. “Taipei” is a love story, and although it’s Lin’s third novel it’s also, in a sense, a classic first novel: it’s semi-autobiographical...
-NY Times

Synopsis

From one of this generation's most talked about and enigmatic writers comes a deeply personal, powerful, and moving novel about family, relationships, accelerating drug use, and the lingering possibility of death.
 
Taipei by Tao Lin is an ode--or lament--to the way we live now. Following Paul from New York, where he comically navigates Manhattan's art and literary scenes, to Taipei, Taiwan,  where he confronts his family's roots, we see one relationship fail, while another is born on the internet and blooms into an unexpected wedding in Las Vegas. Along the way—whether on all night drives up the East Coast, shoplifting excursions in the South, book readings on the West Coast, or ill advised grocery runs in Ohio—movies are made with laptop cameras, massive amounts of drugs are ingested, and two young lovers come to learn what it means to share themselves completely. The result is a suspenseful meditation on memory, love, and what it means to be alive, young, and on the fringe in America, or anywhere else for that matter.
 

About Tao Lin

See more books from this Author
Tao Lin is the author of the novels Richard Yates and Eeeee Eee Eeee, the novella Shoplifting from American Apparel, the story collection Bed, and the poetry collections cognitive-behavioral therapy and you are a little bit happier than i am. His work has been translated to twelve languages and he lives in Manhattan.
 
Published June 4, 2013 by Vintage. 257 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Taipei
All: 8 | Positive: 5 | Negative: 3

NY Times

Excellent
Reviewed by Clancy Martin on Jun 28 2013

Here we have a serious, first-rate novelist putting all his skills to work. “Taipei” is a love story, and although it’s Lin’s third novel it’s also, in a sense, a classic first novel: it’s semi-autobiographical...

Read Full Review of Taipei (Vintage Contemporarie... | See more reviews from NY Times

NY Times

Good
Reviewed by Dwight Garner on Jun 04 2013

At its best, it has distant echoes of early Hemingway, as filtered through Twitter and Klonopin: it’s terse, neutral, composed of small and often intricate gestures.

Read Full Review of Taipei (Vintage Contemporarie... | See more reviews from NY Times

Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Ian Sansom on Jul 04 2013

On the book's front cover, Bret Easton Ellis is quoted as saying "With Taipei Tao Lin becomes the most interesting prose stylist of his generation." Ellis's quote seems to have come from a tweet, which goes on, "which isn't to say that Taipei isn't a boring novel."

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Anthony Cummins on Jul 20 2013

Lin is often compared to Bret Easton Ellis, and as with Ellis, you could read him as an anatomist of culture, or merely its symptom, but Taipei delivers more than enough satisfaction to make the choice needless.

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Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Ian Sansom on Jul 04 2013

Taipei might be the first truly social media novel, in so far as it resembles a piece of social media. A massive discharge of waste matter. Overspill. Underwritten.

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NPR

Above average
Reviewed by Annalisa Quinn on Jun 11 2013

Unfortunately, Paul's mind, more often than not, is not someplace you especially want to be. That is the riddle of Taipei: It's boring and harrowing; dull and wildly creative.

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Financial Times

Above average
Reviewed by John Sunyer on Jul 12 2013

Lin’s prose is occasionally very funny – until its bleakness sinks in – relying on meandering, uninflected assertions with a deadpan finish.

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LA Times

Good
Reviewed by Lydia Millet on Jun 20 2013

Lin's achievement is less robot than mannequin, polymer on the outside and air within.

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Reader Rating for Taipei
53%

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Evee Lee

Evee Lee 25 Jan 2014

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