Talking Leaves by Joseph Bruchac

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His extensive research is evidenced by details such as Tsalagi women’s prominent social status and a survivor’s retelling of the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. Themes of preserving identity and culture through both spoken and written language will appeal to readers of all ages.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

A new work of historical fiction about Sequoyah and the creation of the Cherokee alphabet, from the acclaimed author of Code Talker 

Thirteen-year-old Uwohali has not seen his father, Sequoyah, for many years. So when Sequoyah returns to the village, Uwohali is eager to reconnect. But Sequoyah’s new obsession with making strange markings causes friends and neighbors in their tribe to wonder whether he is crazy, or worse—practicing witchcraft. What they don’t know, and what Uwohali discovers, is that Sequoyah is a genius and his strange markings are actually an alphabet representing the sounds of the Cherokee language. 
The story of one of the most important figures in Native American history is brought to life for middle grade readers.
 

About Joseph Bruchac

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Joseph Bruchac is the author of Skeleton Man, The Return of Skeleton Man, Bearwalker, The Dark Pond, and Whisper in the Dark, as well as numerous other critically acclaimed novels, poems, and stories, many drawing on his Abenaki heritage. Mr. Bruchac and his wife, Carol, live in upstate New York, in the same house where he was raised by his grandparents.
 
Published August 23, 2016 by Dial Books. 244 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Kirkus

Good
on Aug 09 2016

His extensive research is evidenced by details such as Tsalagi women’s prominent social status and a survivor’s retelling of the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. Themes of preserving identity and culture through both spoken and written language will appeal to readers of all ages.

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