Teaching Statistics by Andrew Gelman
A Bag of Tricks

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Synopsis

Students in the sciences, economics, psychology, social sciences, and medicine take introductory statistics. Statistics is increasingly offered at the high school level as well. However, statistics can be notoriously difficult to teach as it is seen by many students as difficult and boring, if not irrelevant to their subject of choice. To help dispel these misconceptions, Gelman and Nolan have put together this fascinating and thought-provoking book. Based on years
of teaching experience the book provides a wealth of demonstrations, examples and projects that involve active student participation.

Part I of the book presents a large selection of activities for introductory statistics courses and combines chapters such as, 'First week of class', with exercises to break the ice and get students talking; then 'Descriptive statistics' , collecting and displaying data; then follows the traditional topics - linear regression, data collection, probability and inference. Part II gives tips on what does and what doesn't work in class: how to set up effective demonstrations and examples, how to
encourage students to participate in class and work effectively in group projects. A sample course plan is provided. Part III presents material for more advanced courses on topics such as decision theory, Bayesian statistics and sampling.
 

About Andrew Gelman

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Andrew Gelman is Professor of Statistics and Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. He has published over 150 articles in statistical theory, methods, and computation, and in applications areas including decision analysis, survey sampling, political science, public health, and policy. His other books are Bayesian Data Analysis (1995, second edition 2003) and Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks (2002). Carlin, University of Melbourne, Australia. Stern, Iowa State University, Ames. Professor Donald B. Rubin is the John L. Loeb Professor of Statistics in the Department of Statistics at Harvard University. Professor Rubin is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute for Mathematical Statistics, the International Statistical Institute, the Woodrow Wilson Society, the John Simon Guggenheim Society, the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also the recipient of the Samuel S. Wilks Medal of the American Statistical Association, the Parzen Prize for Statistical Innovation, and the Fisher Lectureship. Professor Rubin has lectured extensively throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. He has over 300 publications (including several books) on a variety of statistical topics and is one of the top ten highly cited writers in mathematics in the world, according to ISI Science Watch.
 
Published August 8, 2002 by OUP Oxford. 316 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Education & Reference, Professional & Technical, Science & Math. Non-fiction

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