The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century by Peter Dreier
A Social Justice Hall of Fame

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Synopsis

A hundred years ago, any soapbox orator who called for women’s suffrage, laws protecting the environment, an end to lynching, or a federal minimum wage was considered a utopian dreamer or a dangerous socialist. Now we take these ideas for granted— because the radical ideas of one generation are often the common sense of the next. We all stand on the shoulders of earlier generations of radicals and reformers who challenged the status quo of their day.

Unfortunately, most Americans know little of this progressive history. It isn’t taught in most high schools. You can’t find it on the major television networks. In popular media, the most persistent interpreter of America’s radical past is Glenn Beck, who teaches viewers a wildly inaccurate history of unions, civil rights, and the American Left.

The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century, a colorful and witty history of the most influential progressive leaders of the twentieth century and beyond, is the perfect antidote.

 

About Peter Dreier

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Peter Dreier is E. P. Clapp Distinguished Professor of Politics and Director of the Urban and Environmental Policy Program at Occidental College. He writes regularly for the Nation, American Prospect, Huffington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Talking Points Memo. He lives in Los Angeles, California.
 
Published June 26, 2012 by Nation Books. 512 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

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Florence Kelley spearheaded labor laws in Illinois for women and children, paving the way for national reform;

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Huffington Post

Shelton said that Dylan seemed like a "cross between a beatnik and a choir boy" and referred to four of the songs he performed that night: the traditional "House of the Rising Sun" and three humorous songs Dylan wrote--"Talkin' Bear Mountain," "Talkin' New York," and "Talkin' Havah Nagilah."

May 25 2016 | Read Full Review of The 100 Greatest Americans of...

Huffington Post

During a visit to California in 1931, physicist Albert Einstein, then living in Europe, asked to meet actor Charlie Chaplin, also an international celebrity and political radical.

Mar 14 2014 | Read Full Review of The 100 Greatest Americans of...

Huffington Post

In a profile of Klein for The Guardian that questions Klein's journalistic integrity, reporter Jon Swaine quotes Klein's former Times colleague Max Frankel suggesting that Klein's embrace of conservatism was, at least initially, more a matter of opportunism than conviction.

Dec 11 2014 | Read Full Review of The 100 Greatest Americans of...

City Book Review

Also, tens of thousands of baby boomers born between 1946 to 1960 became politically active and were committed to social justice in twentieth century.

Sep 06 2012 | Read Full Review of The 100 Greatest Americans of...

Tikkun

Including Heschel would not diminish the film’s emphasis on the centrality of African Americans in the civil rights struggle, but it would have lent the film more historical accuracy, not simply about one man but as a representative of the role Jews played in the freedom struggle and as a reflect...

Jan 20 2015 | Read Full Review of The 100 Greatest Americans of...

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