The Adjacent by Christopher Priest

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So people may resonate with each other in their relationship and, no matter whether we’re persuaded to see them as physically close or widely separated, they remain close even though a magic trick might make it appear one had disappeared. The Adjacent is strongly recommended to everyone who enjoys thoughtful fiction.
-Thinking About Books

Synopsis

The eagerly anticipated new novel from “one of the master illusionists of our time.” (Wired)

In the near future, Tibor Tarent, a freelance photographer, is recalled from Anatolia to Britain when his wife, an aid worker, is killed—annihilated by a terrifying weapon that reduces its target to a triangular patch of scorched earth. 

A century earlier, Tommy Trent, a stage magician, is sent to the Western Front on a secret mission to render British reconnaissance aircraft invisible to the enemy.

Present day. A theoretical physicist develops a new method of diverting matter, a discovery with devastating consequences that will resonate through time.
 

About Christopher Priest

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Christopher Priest was born in Cheshire, England. He has published eleven novels, three short-story collections, and a number of other books, including critical works, biographies, novelizations, and children's nonfiction. In 1996 Priest won the World Fantasy Award and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel The Prestige, which was adapted into a film by Christopher Nolan in 2006. His most recent novel, The Separation, won both the Arthur C. Clarke Award and the British Science Fiction Association Award. Priest and his wife, the writer Leigh Kennedy, live in Hastings, England, with their twin children. John Clute was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1940, but has lived most of his life in England. He has won three Hugo Awards for his nonfiction. Recent work includes Appleseed, a novel, The Darkening Garden: A Short Lexicon of Horror, and Canary Fever: Reviews.
 
Published April 8, 2014 by Titan Books. 429 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Action & Adventure, History, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The Adjacent
All: 4 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 1

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Sam Leith on Jun 26 2013

...there's no question that you turn from one page to the next with absorption and enjoyment – and that if The Adjacent leaves you unsatisfied...It's better to set too many hares running, in other words, than to set too few.

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WSJ online

Below average
Reviewed by Tom Shippey on Apr 04 2014

"The Adjacent," then, does not provide the typical sci-fi boost: a buried analysis of the present, a warning or solution. Instead it's all visions, illusions, mystery. The only resolutions are personal ones...So this is not a book for traditionalists. A chiller, not a thriller, meant to disturb.

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NPR

Above average
Reviewed by Jason Heller on May 11 2014

It's not necessary to have read Priest's prior work to fully appreciate The Adjacent, but it certainly doesn't hurt. The hunt for Easter eggs even acts a fun distraction when Trent, Tarent, and Torrance are ultimately forced to confront their identities — and the multifaceted nature of reality itself — in a frightening new light.

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Thinking About Books

Good
Reviewed by David Marshall on Feb 19 2014

So people may resonate with each other in their relationship and, no matter whether we’re persuaded to see them as physically close or widely separated, they remain close even though a magic trick might make it appear one had disappeared. The Adjacent is strongly recommended to everyone who enjoys thoughtful fiction.

Read Full Review of The Adjacent

Reader Rating for The Adjacent
57%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 31 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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