The Aeneid by Virgil

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Synopsis

From the award-winning translator of The Iliad and The Odyssey comes a brilliant new translation of Virgil's great epic

Fleeing the ashes of Troy, Aeneas, Achilles’ mighty foe in the Iliad, begins an incredible journey to fulfill his destiny as the founder of Rome. His voyage will take him through stormy seas, entangle him in a tragic love affair, and lure him into the world of the dead itself--all the way tormented by the vengeful Juno, Queen of the Gods. Ultimately, he reaches the promised land of Italy where, after bloody battles and with high hopes, he founds what will become the Roman empire. An unsparing portrait of a man caught between love, duty, and fate, the Aeneid redefines passion, nobility, and courage for our times. Robert Fagles, whose acclaimed translations of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey were welcomed as major publishing events, brings the Aeneid to a new generation of readers, retaining all of the gravitas and humanity of the original Latin as well as its powerful blend of poetry and myth. Featuring an illuminating introduction to Virgil’s world by esteemed scholar Bernard Knox, this volume lends a vibrant new voice to one of the seminal literary achievements of the ancient world.

For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
 

About Virgil

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Morris was the Victorian Age's model of the Renaissance man. Arrested in 1885 for preaching socialism on a London street corner (he was head of the Hammersmith Socialist League and editor of its paper, The Commonweal, at the time), he was called before a magistrate and asked for identification. He modestly described himself upon publication (1868--70) as "Author of "The Earthly Paradise,' pretty well known, I think, throughout Europe." He might have added that he was also the head of Morris and Company, makers of fine furniture, carpets, wallpapers, stained glass, and other crafts; founder of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings; and founder, as well as chief designer, for the Kelmscott Press, which set a standard for fine book design that has carried through to the present. His connection to design is significant. Morris and Company, for example, did much to revolutionize the art of house decoration and furniture in England. Morris's literary productions spanned the spectrum of styles and subjects. He began under the influence of Dante Gabriel Rossetti with a Pre-Raphaelite volume called The Defence of Guenevere and Other Poems (1858); he turned to narrative verse, first in the pastoral mode ("The Earthly Paradise") and then under the influence of the Scandinavian sagas ("Sigurd the Volsung"). After "Sigurd," his masterpiece, Morris devoted himself for a time exclusively to social and political affairs, becoming known as a master of the public address; then, during the last decade of his life, he fused these two concerns in a series of socialist romances, the most famous of which is News from Nowhere (1891).
 
Published November 2, 2006 by Penguin Classic. 500 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Aeneid

Publishers Weekly

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Princeton scholar Fagles follows up his celebrated Iliad and Odyssey with a new, fast-moving, readable rendition of the natio

Sep 18 2006 | Read Full Review of The Aeneid

The New York Times

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Has any book been recast into English more times than Virgil’s "Aeneid"? Robert Fagles, the poem’s newest translator, comes to the fray well armed.

Dec 17 2006 | Read Full Review of The Aeneid

The New York Times

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Between the Latin hexameter and the standard English line for long narrative poems — iambic pentameter — lies an unbridgeable chasm.

Dec 17 2006 | Read Full Review of The Aeneid

The New York Times

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Has any book been recast into English more times than Virgil’s "Aeneid"? Robert Fagles, the poem’s newest translator, comes to the fray well armed.

Dec 17 2006 | Read Full Review of The Aeneid

The Guardian

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Aeneid by Virgil, translated by Frederick Ahl 480pp, Oxford, £16.99 The story of Virgil's Aeneid (composed from about 29-19BC) is straightforward.

Nov 17 2007 | Read Full Review of The Aeneid

BookPage

The Aeneid, sparked by Octavian's request for a narrative that would pay tribute to his government, occupied the last decade of Virgil's life, and although he died before he could finish it, the poem was immediately appreciated as a work of genius.

Aug 04 2014 | Read Full Review of The Aeneid

Open Letters Monthly

it’s a daring choice – at least, by classicist terms – made without fanfare on Ruden’s part) The generating cause of the poem couldn’t be crasser: Rome’s sniveling, parvenu emperor, Octavian-now-called-Augustus, instructed his cultural procurer Maecenas to find a poet willing to sing the praises ...

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Bookmarks Magazine

Ron Smith San Diego Union-Tribune 5 of 5 Stars "Robert Fagles’ new translation of The Aeneid presents a vigorous, passionate Virgil, and a heroic Aeneas, who guides his flock of followers from the fall of Troy in Asia Minor through the Mediterranean to adventures in Carthage, landing in Ital...

Aug 21 2007 | Read Full Review of The Aeneid

The New York Review of Books

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Apr 12 2007 | Read Full Review of The Aeneid

Project MUSE

Chapter 2, "Tiber and Numicus," explores Virgil's allusions to the sacrificial fate of Aeneas—implied in the two divergent traditions of his end (either drowned or translated to heaven and deified while offering sacrifice on the banks of the river Numicus)—through the association, on the one hand...

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Project MUSE

The excellent reports by Brian Rose have done much to make us understand how the epic tradition was embodied and made real by the Hellenistic-Roman city: the important point for me is not whether Vergil actually visited Troy or cared about the material existence of the place, it is more about way...

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Project MUSE

The dominant figure characterizing ekphrasis in the Aeneid is synecdoche: that is, ekphrasis, Putnam shows us, serves as a mise en abîme in the Aeneid, in which the circularity of ekphrasis both interrupts and comments on the narrative linearity of epic (97, 204, passim).

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Carlin Romano

From its arms-and-the-man opening to its climactic blood bath on the battlefield, the Latin epic tells a tale of exile, combat, and slaughter, with a body count rivaling that of Homer's ...

May 16 2008 | Read Full Review of The Aeneid

The Paris Review

Paris Review - From the 'Aeneid,' Book VI, Virgil The Paris Review Follow Us Twitter Facebook Tumblr RSS Contact |

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