The African Dream by Ernesto "Che" Guevara
The Diaries of the Revolutionary War in the Congo

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Ernesto "Che" Guevara was one of the greatest exemplars of the revolutionary 1960s, a man whose heroic adventures were essential to the success of the Cuban Revolution and whose legend fired the imaginations of a whole generation. In 1965, amid worldwide conjecture, Guevara left Cuba, where he was a minister in Fidel Castro's postrevolutionary government, and traveled incognito to the heart of Africa. People's hero Patrice Lumumba had recently been assassinated, and Guevara was to put his theories of guerrilla warfare to use helping the oppressed people of the Congo throw off the yoke of colonial imperialism. The first task was to assist the young Laurent Kabila in his struggle against Mobutu and Tshombe, the two key figures in the newly independent nation. For the first time, The African Dream collects Guevara's unabridged journals of the expedition. They are the record of the bitter failure of a political and ideological dream, and a telling complement to the subsequent rise of Kabila and his recent demise. Most of all, the diaries afford the reader a very personal insight into the thoughts and emotions of Che Guevara, the twentieth century's great revolutionary martyr.
 

About Ernesto "Che" Guevara

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Ernesto "Che" Guevara was born in Rosario, Argentina on June 14, 1928, to an aristocratic family of Spanish-Irish descent. He was known from an early age for his dynamic personality and radical points of view. Guevara graduated from the University of Buenos Aires with a degree of doctor of medicine and surgery in 1953. He witnessed the 1954 CIA-backed coup in Guatemala that ended the regime of socialist Jacobo Arbenz. As a direct result, Guevara became convinced that the United States would never support leftist governments and that violent revolution was the only way to end poverty in Latin America. He joined Fidel Castro's 26th of July Movement in 1956, and following the Cuban Revolution held several influential posts in the new socialist government, including Minister of Industries. In 1965, Che left Cuba for the ex-Belgian Congo to support the Marxist Simba movement, which was ultimately unsuccessful. Following his time in Africa, Guevara traveled to Bolivia to teach guerrilla warfare to native Communists preparing for revolution. He was captured during a military operation by army forces supported by the United States and executed on October 9, 1967. Guevara's remains were discovered in 1997 and relocated to a mausoleum in Cuba. Guevara had a daughter with Hilda Gadea, whom he married in 1955 and divorced in 1959, and four children with his second wife, Aleida March, a Cuban-born member of the 26th of July movement. He also had a son with Lilia Rosa López. After his death Guevara became a global icon of martyrdom and a symbol of rebellion, particularly during the worldwide student protests of the late 1960s. Among his most noted written works, which include texts on guerilla warfare, socialism, and political economy, are "The Motorcycle Diaries," "Bolivian Diary," and "Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War.
 
Published July 1, 2000 by Harvill Pr. 244 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, War, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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A firsthand account of an ill-fated Marxist revolution in the Congo, with an introduction by historian Richard Gott and an afterword by Aleida Guevara March, daughter of Guevara.

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Publishers Weekly

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"This is the history of a failure." With these words, Guevara, the Cuban revolutionary and leftist icon killed in Bolivia in 1967, launches into a brutally honest account of Cuba's disa

Aug 27 2001 | Read Full Review of The African Dream: The Diarie...

The New York Times

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With their country split by a civil war that Laurent Kabila, once president, had neither the desire nor ability to end, 52 million Congolese can attest to the character faults spotted by Guevara, who would have been amazed by his former ally's successful ousting of Mobutu Sese Seko, if not his as...

Nov 11 2001 | Read Full Review of The African Dream: The Diarie...

Publishers Weekly

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With these words, Guevara, the Cuban revolutionary and leftist icon killed in Bolivia in 1967, launches into a brutally honest account of Cuba's disastrous 1965 intervention in Congo.

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