The Age of Entanglement by Louisa Gilder
When Quantum Physics Was Reborn

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Synopsis

In The Age of Entanglement, Louisa Gilder brings to life one of the pivotal debates in twentieth century physics. In 1935, Albert Einstein famously showed that, according to the quantum theory, separated particles could act as if intimately connected–a phenomenon which he derisively described as “spooky action at a distance.” In that same year, Erwin Schrödinger christened this correlation “entanglement.” Yet its existence was mostly ignored until 1964, when the Irish physicist John Bell demonstrated just how strange this entanglement really was. Drawing on the papers, letters, and memoirs of the twentieth century’s greatest physicists, Gilder both humanizes and dramatizes the story by employing the scientists’ own words in imagined face-to-face dialogues. The result is a richly illuminating exploration of one of the most exciting concepts of quantum physics.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Louisa Gilder

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Louisa Gilder was born in Tyringham, Massachusetts, and graduated from Dartmouth College in 2000. This is her first book.
 
Published November 11, 2008 by Vintage. 464 pages
Genres: Science & Math, Professional & Technical, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Age of Entanglement

Kirkus Reviews

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Fast-paced history from debut author Gilder, who employs invented but historically accurate dialogue to surprisingly good effect, revealing the personalities as well as the ideas of quantum physicists.

Nov 12 2008 | Read Full Review of The Age of Entanglement: When...

The New York Times

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A history of quantum mechanics that goes beyond the point in the 1920s where most popular science books leave off.

Mar 29 2009 | Read Full Review of The Age of Entanglement: When...

The New York Times

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But Bell showed that if a certain measurable inequality was confirmed experimentally, it would follow that any successor theory to quantum physics you tried to write would itself exhibit one of the strangest features of quantum theory: it will still be non-local.

Mar 26 2009 | Read Full Review of The Age of Entanglement: When...

Publishers Weekly

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The story of quantum mechanics and its lively cast of supporters, “heretics” and agnostics has always fascinated science historians and popular science readers.

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