The Age of Reform by Rodney P. Carlisle
1890 to 1920 (Handbook to Life in America)

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The first decades of the 20th century were characterized by technological advancements. Chief among these was the replacement of horse-drawn vehicles by the gasoline-powered car, which necessitated the development of a nationwide infrastructure of paved highways and filling stations. The racial landscape of America was altered as well by the exodus of large numbers of African Americans from the rural south to such cities as Chicago, St. Louis, and New York. While America's participation in World War I was limited due to a lengthy neutrality policy, the conflict produced a shift in the country's morals that shaped both popular and political culture throughout the rest of the century, exemplified by the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920 which granted women the right to vote.

About Rodney P. Carlisle

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General editor Rodney P. Carlisle earned a B.A. in history from Harvard University and both an M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a former chair of the history department at Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey, where he taught for more than 30 years, specializing in 20th-century history. Carlisle is now professor emeritus there. He has written and edited many articles and more than 10 books on history, including The Thirties in Facts On File's Day by Day series.
Published April 30, 2009 by Facts on File (J). 291 pages
Genres: History, Education & Reference, Young Adult. Non-fiction

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