The Algebraist by Iain M. Banks

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Synopsis

It is 4034 AD. Humanity has made it to the stars. Fassin Taak, a Slow Seer at the Court of the Nasqueron Dwellers, will be fortunate if he makes it to the end of the year. The Nasqueron Dwellers inhabit a gas giant on the outskirts of the galaxy, in a system awaiting its wormhole connection to the rest of civilisation. In the meantime, they are dismissed as decadents living in a state of highly developed barbarism, hoarding data without order, hunting their own young and fighting pointless formal wars. Seconded to a military-religious order he's barely heard of - part of the baroque hierarchy of the Mercatoria, the latest galactic hegemony - Fassin Taak has to travel again amongst the Dwellers. He is in search of a secret hidden for half a billion years. But with each day that passes a war draws closer - a war that threatens to overwhelm everything and everyone he's ever known. As complex, turbulent, flamboyant and spectacular as the gas giant on which it is set, the new science fiction novel from Iain M. Banks is space opera on a truly epic scale.
 

About Iain M. Banks

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Iain Banks was born in Fife in 1954 and was educated at Stirling University where he studied English Literature, Philosophy and Psychology. Banks came to widespread and controversial public note with the publication of his first novel, The Wasp Factory, in 1984. His first science fiction novel, Consider Phlebas, was published in 1987. He continued to write both mainstream fiction (as Iain Banks) and science fiction (as Iain M. Banks). Banks' mainstream fiction included The Wasp Factory (1984), Walking on Glass (1985), The Bridge (1986), Espedair Street (1987), Canal Dreams (1989), The Crow Road (1992), Complicity (1993), Whit (1995), A Song of Stone (1997), The Business (1999), Dead Air (2002) and The Steep Approach to Garbadale (2007). His final book, The Quarry, was released posthumously on June 20, 2013. Banks died on June 9, 2013 of terminal gall bladder cancer.
 
Published July 4, 2005 by Orbit. 544 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Algebraist

The Guardian

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Banks as a writer is capable of delivering great novels - he did it in The Wasp Factory, and also in The Bridge, where he made few concessions to his love of analysis and no concessions at all to the reader.

Oct 22 2004 | Read Full Review of The Algebraist

Publishers Weekly

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Banks (Look to Windward ) pulls out all the stops in this gloriously over-the-top, state-of-the-art space opera, a Hugo nominee in its British edition. In a galax

Aug 22 2005 | Read Full Review of The Algebraist

The Bookbag

but less of the darkness of human insanity that can be found in Iain Banks's mainstream novels or writings of authors like Harlan Elisson or JG Ballard, or even some of the Banks's own Culture novels ( Consider Phlebas).

Jan 07 2011 | Read Full Review of The Algebraist

Nights and Weekends

The Algebraist - Iain M. Banks ... BUY THE BOOK ... a time when humanity is
spread far and wide throughout the galaxy, this novel tells the story of Fassin
Taak, ...

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BookIdeas.com

Dweller society is almost entirely male, since becoming female and bearing one or more children is a voluntary duty taken on reluctantly by most individuals, who value their independence and freedom of action far more than they do the need to produce another generation.

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