The Almighty by Irving Wallace

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Edward Armstead has lived much of his life in the shadow of his famous media lord father. When his father dies, he leaves a will that makes it nearly impossible for Edward to keep the thing he wants most - The New York Record - his father's flagship newspaper. Edward's determination to exceed his father drives him to embark on two obsessive quests - to make the New York Reporter the number one newspaper in the city - and then the world - and to make his father's young mistress his own. In a swiftly paced and prescient story reaching out of Manhattan into the inner circles of power in England, France, Spain, Switzerland, and Israel, a growing wave of violence gives the publisher sensational headlines, exclusive to the Record, that turn Armstead into a media legend almost overnight. As Weston begins to believe his own hype, considering himself media's 'Almighty', a young, prize-winning investigative reporter on his staff, Victoria Weston, begins to suspect that someone is manipulating front-page news. As she follows her investigation through France and back to Manhattan, she begins to suspect the terrible truth. This novel brings Rupert Murdoch and the current string of media scandals immediately to mind. A sobering tale of power, corruption, and madness at the highest levels from a master craftsman of the written word.

About Irving Wallace

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Irving Wallace was born March 19, 1916 in Chicago, Illinois. He began writing for various magazines at age 15 and worked as a screenwriter for a number of Hollywood studios---Columbia, Fox, Warner Brothers, Universal, and MGM from 1950 to 1959, then he turned solely to writing books. His first major bestseller was The Chapman Report in 1960, a fictional account of a sexual research team's investigations of a wealthy Los Angeles suburb. Among other fictional works by Wallace are The Prize and The Word. His meticulously researched fiction often has the flavor of spicy journalism. A great deal of research goes into his novels, which cover a wide variety of subjects, from the presentation of the Nobel Prize to political scenarios. With their recurring dramatic confrontations, his novels lend themselves well to screenplay adaptation, and most of them have been filmed, including The Chapman Report and The Prize. Wallace has also compiled several nonfiction works with his family, including The People's Almanac and The Book of Lists, both of which have spawned sequels. Irving Wallace died June 29, 1990 in Los Angeles, California at the age of 74 from pancreatic cancer.
Published October 1, 1982 by Doubleday. 403 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference. Fiction

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