The Amos Oz Reader by Amos Oz

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Synopsis

The Reader draws on Oz’s entire body of work, loosely grouped into four themes: the kibbutz, the city of Jerusalem, the idea of a "promised land," and his own life story. Included are excerpts from his celebrated novels, among them Where the Jackals Howl, A Perfect Peace, My Michael, Fima, Black Box, and To Know a Woman. Nonfiction is represented by selections from Under This Blazing Light, The Slopes of Lebanon, In the Land of Israel, and Oz’s masterpiece, A Tale of Love and Darkness. Robert Alter, a noted Hebrew scholar and translator, has provided an illuminating introduction.

 

About Amos Oz

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AMOS OZ was born in 1939 in Jerusalem. At the age of fifteen, he left home, and lived and worked for many years on a kibbutz. His first book, Where the Jackals Howl, was published in Israel in 1965 to immediate acclaim. He is one of the leading figures of the Peace Now movement and has written and lectured widely on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Harcourt has published Amos Oz's work for the past thirty-five years, most recently his memoir, A Tale of Love and Darkness, an international bestseller and the recipient of the Koret Jewish Book Award, among many other honors. NITZA BEN-DOV is a professor of Hebrew and comparative literature at Haifa University, as well as a scholar of biblical poetics.
 
Published April 14, 2009 by Mariner Books. 416 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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Her reluctant efforts draw in the amused Theo, involve the unwise purchase of a ``derelict building,'' and necessitate the couple's continuing involvement with a colorfully portrayed bevy of townspeople, most notably the canny woman mayor Batsheva Dinur and local businessman and hustler Muki Pele...

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Mysteries bedevil the inhabitants of an Israeli village in this slim story collection, the 14th work of fiction from the renowned Israeli (Rhyming Life and Death, 2009, etc.).

Sep 01 2011 | Read Full Review of The Amos Oz Reader

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Oz’s sensitive readings show a way of taking fiction seriously as pleasure and then heightening that pleasure by exploring the different ways in which writers achieve meaning.

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All Fima's dissatisfied longings come to a head in a magical, climactic epiphany on a Friday afternoon ramble through Jerusalem and its sequel, which shows Fima finally coming to terms with his status as a present-day Wandering Jew.

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“Almost everyone in Jerusalem in those days,” writes novelist Oz (The Same Sea, 2001, etc.) of the 1940s, “was either a poet or a writer or a researcher or a thinker or a scholar or a world reformer.” Oz’s uncle Joseph Klausner, for instance, kept a 25,000-volume library in every conceivable lang...

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Reality, in these pages at least, exists only in the mind of the Author, who, of course, exists only in the mind of Oz.

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After establishing their fundamental and shared beliefs—they are secular Jews who value the Bible not for its historical or religious meanings but for “its splendor as literature”—they establish their thesis (the printed word has unified and identified Jews) and begin marshaling support.

Aug 29 2012 | Read Full Review of The Amos Oz Reader

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Add to this a mysterious Portuguese woman who sleeps with Enrico, a carpenter dead by suicide, Albert's co-worker and confidante Bettina, who has a yen for him dating back decades, a cryptic yuppie named Giggy who sleeps with Dita and, just to make the whole thing depressingly postmodern, the Nar...

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His most wrenching essay terms Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon “a war of deceit and brainwashing.” Oz writes about the many changes he’s witnessed in Jerusalem, about the existence of evil in the world—he chides Freudians and just about all other social scientists for their failure to engage wi...

Feb 15 2009 | Read Full Review of The Amos Oz Reader

The New York Times

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The new novella from Amos Oz, one of Israel’s most esteemed authors, is a somewhat brutal look at the life and sensibility of a literary celebrity.

Apr 13 2009 | Read Full Review of The Amos Oz Reader

MostlyFiction Book Reviews

Her only child resembles Michael in personality, a child rooted in reality, who “finds objects much more interesting than people or words.” Writing in short, factual sentences, which come alive through his choice of details, author Amos Oz, often mentioned as a Nobel Prize candidate, recreates...

Apr 19 2009 | Read Full Review of The Amos Oz Reader

MostlyFiction Book Reviews

Among these characters is Tsefania Beit-Halachmi (also known as Avraham “Bumek” Schuldenfrei), an elderly poet who is the author of a collection of poems called Rhyming Life and Death.” The poems themselves echo throughout the book—mostly doggerel—as both the narrator/Author and the book’s autho...

Apr 19 2009 | Read Full Review of The Amos Oz Reader

MostlyFiction Book Reviews

AUTHOR WEBSITE: Wikipedia page on Amos Oz EXTRAS: Reading Guide and Excerpt MORE ON MOSTLYFICTION: Read our review of: Rhyming Life and Death My Michael A Tale of Love and Darkness

Mar 21 2011 | Read Full Review of The Amos Oz Reader

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